NEW! BookIsh Plaza Page on Facebook

13 11 2012

BookIsh Plaza has a page on facebook with new and interesting Caribbean books in diverse lanuanges, an agenda and pictures of events.
Do like the page if your into books.

Click on BookIsh Plaza Facebook Page & like it!

Advertisements




BookIsh Plaza with Books @ Book Club Meeting

4 11 2012





NEW November Issue of BookIsh Plaza Ezine

3 11 2012

The November issue has a lot of book news. With these cold nights just take a book as your window of the world. We like to introduce you to the Caribbean reading vibe. Highlights are the coming Dutch Caribbean Book Club meeting next weekend, revival of the Kompa Nanzi stories for kids, New Arrived books, the Tip of the month is a kids dictionary in Papiamento and much more.

Papiamento is a creole language spoken in the Dutch Caribbean islands of Aruba, Curaçao & Bonaire.

Enjoy reading the ezine.

Check it out @ BookIsh Plaza Ezine nr 10, NOV 2012





Photo Impression BookIsh Plaza @ Meeting Dutch-Aruban Society

3 11 2012





Write a Novel the Easy Way

3 11 2012

How to Write a Novel in a Month (The Easy Way!)

November is National Novel Writing Month and in honor of that, Maya Rodale, author of smart and sassy romance novels shares her system (developed over the course of writing 10-plus books) for quickly producing a good novel without a ton of angst and anguish.

According to Rodale if cutting yourself off from the world (and Internet) at a five-star hotel with excellent room service is not an option, try the following:

  1. Know your characters. A novel won’t work without fully developed, compelling characters. Take the time to know the hero and heroines story before you start plotting or writing. You may never explicitly use this information in the text, but it will enhance your story.
  2. An outline is totally worth your time. I know, you want to start immediately and see where the muse leads you. Well, the muse is a trickster and may lead you down a dead end path. Or perhaps she’s using Apple Maps. With an outline, you know where you’re heading and have an idea of the route you’re going to take, which makes for a smoother journey. You can always take side trips.
  3. Draft #1: Focus on dialogue. Estimate word count: 40,000 The first draft of my novels is entirely dialogue. This is the most direct way to make sure your characters are telling the story and moving it forward. Unless it’s a multicharacter scene, I won’t even include tags like “he said” or “she said.” If you can’t tell when your hero or heroine is talking without identifying it, then it’s a sign you need to go back and work on their character and voice.
  4. Draft #2: Crank out everything else. Estimated word count: 65,000 This is another FAST draft full of description and everything else. It’s full of really awkward sentences and misplaced punctuation marks. I add lots of “TKs” (wherever something is “to come”) when I’m not sure of a word but just want to keep going.
  5. Print, read, make notes. Print out a copy and read it with a pen in hand. You’re not just looking for typos or ways to tighten your sentences, but also trying to figure out how the story hangs together before you write so many words that it’s a nightmare to relocate scenes. Likewise, it’s far easier on the soul to cut fluffy, useless scenes when you haven’t invested much time in them.
  6. Draft 3: Craft. Word count: 80,000 This is where it starts to get good. You’ve cut the rubbish scenes, sketched out some new ones. I go over each scene, line by line, really crafting my sentences by cutting useless words and selecting the very best ones to use. This is slow going, but it’s where the magic happens.
  7. Draft 4: Give it to someone to read and do something else. Find someone willing to read your manuscript with fresh eyes while you allow your eyes to rest by working on something else entirely. I like to get a few people to read it, if I can. And then I do not revise until I’ve gotten everyone’s feedback. If three out of three people say your first chapter is weak, it is. If one person says your heroine is vapid, one person loves her, and another commented on something else…well, that’s a muddle to sort though and it’s up to you.
  8. Revise. Again.
  9. Revise. Again.
  10. Send it off into the world. After spending years in the writing world, I suspect that this is the step where most authors fail. This is what separates the published from the unpublished. I think there are many excellent books tucked under beds…but you’re not competing with those. You’re competing with the ones composed by brave authors.

Source: Huffington Post Books





Writing the First Pages

3 11 2012

3 Essential Elements Of A Book’s First Page

If you’re a writer with publishing goals, then you know how important it is that the literary agents or editors reading your material keep reading. After all, if your submission doesn’t hook the reader right away, there are plenty of other submissions to take its place. With that in mind, we’ve outlined three major elements that make or break a piece in the first few pages so that you can make sure you’re submitting the best short story, essay, or book query possible.

1. Character
Any character you present in the opening pages of your essay, short story, or book manuscript should be intriguing. Don’t waste any time; show the reader quickly why it’s worth getting to know the character.

2. Opening Action
To quickly hook your reader, focus in on an intense and important moment. This doesn’t have to be a flashy, shocking scene—and shouldn’t be unless truly appropriate.

3. Setting
Choosing a unique, unexpected, extraordinary setting will give you the automatic bonus of a higher interest factor in your opening pages.

Continue reading @ Huffington Post Books





Photo Impression BookIsh Plaza @ Art Expo UniArte 2012

3 11 2012