Wanna be a Novelist?

11 03 2017

NELL ZINK: HOW TO BECOME
A NOVELIST IN TEN EASY STEPS

1. Examine your motives
2. Arrange financing
3. Write a bad novella
4. Don’t publish the bad novella
5. Think of a plot and characters
6. Write your debut
7. Never worry about style
8. Get an agent
9. Sell it
10. Write another one

Read further @ Literary Hub





Date a Reader

11 03 2017

7 REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD DATE A READER

1.Readers are less stressed
2.Readers have more empathy
3.Readers have a great memory
4.Readers have a big, um, vocabulary
5.Readers are passionate
6.You know what gift to give a reader
7.Readers are better at sex

Read further @ BookRiot





Out Now! BookIsh Plaza eZine MARCH 2017

1 03 2017

img_7340The MARCH issue of BookIsh Plaza eZine is out now!
BookIsh Plaza is your online bookshop for (Dutch)Caribbean literature.

In this issue:

  • Upcoming World Book Day & Bookweek
  • Music Theatre based on a Novel
  • Interview with writer ‘Go Ahead, You’re Home’
  • Spoken Word & Poetry in Curaçao
  • And much more news………

Read & spread the eZine. The next one will appear in April.

BOOKISH PLAZAeZINE nr. 60 MARCH 2017

Visit BookIsh Plaza for our New Arrivals!





A bit late this time! the BookIsh Plaza eZine FEBRUARY 2017

17 02 2017

bp-new-books
The FEBRUARY issue of BookIsh Plaza eZine is a bit late this time. But we’re here with Caribbean book news!
BookIsh Plaza is your online bookshop for (Dutch)Caribbean literature.

In this issue:

  • International Book Giving Day
  • Cuban Winners of the Casa de las Américas Awards
  • Reading Kids, Smarter Kids
  • International Mother Language Day
  • And much more………

Read & spread the eZine. The next one will appear in March.

BOOKISH PLAZA eZINE nr 59 FEBRUARY 2017

Visit BookIsh Plaza for our New Arrivals!





NINE NON-RULES FOR WRITING

17 02 2017

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THE FIRST RULE OF NOVEL-WRITING IS DON’T WRITE A NOVEL

ELIZABETH PERCER: NINE NON-RULES FOR WRITING

If you’d asked me 15 years ago how I saw my future, I would tell you about all the hard work I’d put into earning my doctorate, about the post doc that promised me a way into a fantastic research opportunity; about the tenure track position I hoped to secure one day. I would tell you all this with a clenched jaw, a fierce smile, and a knot in my belly. Because although I’d spent most of my young life envisioning academic achievement as the pinnacle of success and fulfillment, these goals were forged from a lifetime of trying to measure up. I’d shoved my quirky, not particularly scientific self into a mold that suited my family of physicists, mathematicians, and software designers. But somehow along the way, in measuring myself against those I loved and admired, I forgot to check in to see if there was a form within me that was more essential and less shapely, to see if I had measures of my own to follow.

It wouldn’t be until after several life-altering events—most notably, the birth of my three children in somewhat rapid succession—that I would slowly relinquish my grasp on borrowed titles. Once liberated, however, I found myself in the distinctly uncomfortable position of realizing that original compositions are so much harder to develop than derivative ones, not least because they don’t have the same examples to follow.

Still, like any good academic, I tried for years to work at my writing the same way I’d worked at anything. I pushed myself. I was stern with myself. I created strict rules to follow and chastised myself when I didn’t follow them. When that didn’t work, I looked to experts, who told me that I needed to write for about the same time every day in the same place, or that I should seriously consider getting an MFA, or that I should seriously consider not getting an MFA, or who told me that only the most talented writers could succeed, or that true creative talent would never realize any kind of commercial success, or who told me I was too young, or too old. It’s no wonder that in looking for others to tell me how I needed to be, I got into the habit of showing up to my writing at the same time in the same place and freeze.

Read further @ Literary Hub





The New Way to Read

17 02 2017

readwalking

READWALKING: A READER IN MOTION

Reading in motion is nothing new or surprising. Many of us read while moving. The most common place is probably public transportation – subways, trains, buses, unicorns, however it is we get to work or wherever we’re going. But reading while walking still gets me stared at more often than not.

Not only stared at, but talked to. People seem to think that reading while I walk is an invitation to converse with me. They ask me how the book is. They ask me whether I really like it. They ask me what chapter I’m on (in the tone of voice that makes me know they haven’t even looked at the cover and haven’t read the book and have no idea whether it has chapters or not). They also tell me to be careful. Constantly, I’m told to look where I’m going, to watch out, to be careful.

Read further @ Book Riot





Drawing Stories

17 02 2017

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HOW TO DRAW A NOVEL

TRACING THE SHAPES OF THE STORIES WE TELL

Mexican writer Martin Solares likes to draw the shapes of novels—describe the plot, in a literal sense.  The following is the introductory chapter to How to Draw a Novel, a work-in-progress translation—in collaboration with poet Tanya Huntington—of his original Spanish title, Cómo Dibujar Una Novela, which will feature entirely new chapters. 

Some say novels are constellations composed of words; others, the closest we will ever come to a powerful incantation. From page one, they transport us to a world where every word conceals more than one intention and the very laws of physics operate differently. Baptized by their authors with suggestive, enigmatic names that sometimes constitute the first words of the spell being cast, novels are frequently baptized a second time by their readers, transforming them into something more endearing and familiar.

While we are compelled to choose a single bough from the tree of life, albeit a dazzling one, a well-constructed novel can lay claim to several branches at once: the most unexpected and passionate, the most unsettling and amusing. Then there are those that recount the greatest failures, the most ambitious exertions, or the feats that once seemed impossible to us.

Novels do not openly tell us how to live, but they do tell us stories. In difficult times, when one seeks to overcome life’s cares, the novel offers us a tale that seems to have been written expressly for the present time.

Read further @ Literary Hub