How to gain a Bookish New Year

13 01 2018


1. Preorder one book per month (or every other month or every third month) for the new year. Enjoy the surprise of the gift you purchased for yourself when it arrives.

2. Pick a series of books from childhood you’ve always meant to read or want to revisit. Prioritize that reading experience.

3. Buy or make a new bookmark. You can also print yourself a new one, if you’d like.

4. Choose a new planner and set it up with not just your calendar, but also a to-be-read list and a read list. Get creative!

5. Treat yourself to a new tote bag for lugging your hauls to and from the public library.

Read further @ BookRiot

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Some 2017 Highlights of Caribbean Literature

13 01 2018

Commemorating 50 years of CIEN  AÑOS DE SOLEDAD with an illustrated version

 

Writing a new Caribbean: a picture of the Caribbean, as seen by a new generation of writers and poets. Listen to this interesting BBC 4 radio broadcast –

 

– Haitian-American writer Ibi Zoboi was on the Young People’s Literature list of the 2017 National #Book Award Finalists with AMERICAN STREET

For more highlights and articles read it in our new BOOKISH PLAZA eZINE nr. 68 JANUARY 2018 edition.
Just out now!

Visit BookIsh Plaza for our New Arrivals!





Strategies to Help Struggling Young Readers

13 01 2018

Four Teaching Moves That Promote A Growth Mindset In All Readers

Reading can be a very fraught topic for parents, teachers and students. Strong reading skills are essential for accessing later curriculum, so teachers put a lot of emphasis on it early. But the pressure and angst of getting students reading on schedule can sap the joy out of an activity that many young children love. At its heart, reading is a way to access stories, which in turn make readers wonder about the world. In the race to get kids reading, it can be easy to treat reading like a procedure, instead of the complicated experience that it is.

Read further @ KQEDnews





The Rule is Don’t Write a Novel

12 01 2018

THE FIRST RULE OF NOVEL-WRITING IS DON’T WRITE A NOVEL

ELIZABETH PERCER: NINE NON-RULES FOR WRITING

If you’d asked me 15 years ago how I saw my future, I would tell you about all the hard work I’d put into earning my doctorate, about the post doc that promised me a way into a fantastic research opportunity; about the tenure track position I hoped to secure one day. I would tell you all this with a clenched jaw, a fierce smile, and a knot in my belly. Because although I’d spent most of my young life envisioning academic achievement as the pinnacle of success and fulfillment, these goals were forged from a lifetime of trying to measure up. I’d shoved my quirky, not particularly scientific self into a mold that suited my family of physicists, mathematicians, and software designers. But somehow along the way, in measuring myself against those I loved and admired, I forgot to check in to see if there was a form within me that was more essential and less shapely, to see if I had measures of my own to follow.

It wouldn’t be until after several life-altering events—most notably, the birth of my three children in somewhat rapid succession—that I would slowly relinquish my grasp on borrowed titles. Once liberated, however, I found myself in the distinctly uncomfortable position of realizing that original compositions are so much harder to develop than derivative ones, not least because they don’t have the same examples to follow.

Still, like any good academic, I tried for years to work at my writing the same way I’d worked at anything. I pushed myself. I was stern with myself. I created strict rules to follow and chastised myself when I didn’t follow them. When that didn’t work, I looked to experts, who told me that I needed to write for about the same time every day in the same place, or that I should seriously consider getting an MFA, or that I should seriously consider not getting an MFA, or who told me that only the most talented writers could succeed, or that true creative talent would never realize any kind of commercial success, or who told me I was too young, or too old. It’s no wonder that in looking for others to tell me how I needed to be, I got into the habit of showing up to my writing at the same time in the same place and freeze

1.  Don’t write a novel
2. Keep your publishing dreams in check
3. Writing doesn’t always look like writing
4. Books do not respond to timelines, spreadsheets, or graphs
5.  Make space for what comes
6.  Procrastinate
7.  Get to Know the Demons on Your Block
8.  Go Gentle into that Dark Night
9.  Don’t Neglect the Rest of You

Read further @ Literary Hub





20 New Papiamento Children’s Books Published

12 01 2018

20 New Papiamento children’s books were developed by the Language Project of the Department of Education in Aruba for use in the primary schools and the exam classes of the secondary schools. Papiamento is a creole language exclusively spoken on the islands of Aruba, Curaçao and Bonaire (Caribbean).

A group of local collaborators, but also internacional persons, wrote, translated, illustrated and edited the material. A varied offer of original works and three translations was the result.

The themes of the books were selected according to the age group. For the primary schools the topics are: friendship, bullying, nature conservation, sports, stamina and teambuilding. Topics selected for the teens are: peer pressure, love, social life, teen pregnancy and drug abuse.

Authors who collaborated are: Desiree Croes, Lorena Boekhoudt-Almary, Beth Briñez Albertsz, Danielle Janga, Marvis Engelhardt, Shaila Vrolijk, Desiree Correa, Yolanda Croes, Diana Marchena-Martes, Ria Arrindell-Broeks, Gina Ramsbottom, Diana Lebacs (Curaçao), Loekie Morales (St. Maarten) and Sally Green (England).

The books are not for sale, but are available at the local library in Aruba.

Read more articles in our new BOOKISH PLAZA eZINE nr. 68 JANUARY 2018 edition.
Just out now!

Visit BookIsh Plaza for our New Arrivals!





Read More Books in 2018

12 01 2018


It’s resolution time! Indeed it is. How many am I going to read this time around. Set my goals on 30 on GoodReads. Last year it was 20 and I succeeded. Purely literature, no non-fiction that has to do with work. So I stepped up my reading. What’s your reading resolution for this year?
Let see what Jessica Roy advices us over at LATimes.

—————–

It’s resolution time.
Will this be the year you hit the treadmill for an hour every day, make all your meals at home, learn a new language and max out your retirement savings accounts? Perhaps. But more often than not, New Year’s resolutions are abandoned before the first gym payment goes through on your credit card.

This year, make a better resolution: Read more books. In fact, think of it less as a resolution, and more as a belated holiday gift to yourself.

Reading more was my resolution back in 2013. I realized I’d read maybe three books in the previous year. I joined Goodreads, a social media site for book lovers and got an L.A. Public Library card. I asked for an e-reader for Christmas that year. I joined a book club.

I set a goal to read 36 books. I wasn’t too hard on myself as to what counted as reading a book. Audiobooks counted. Cookbooks counted, if I had read through most of the recipes. Graphic novels and comic books counted. Books I got halfway through and then abandoned for lack of interest counted.

Getting back into reading books has been one of the singularly most rewarding things I have done for myself in my adult life. I carry my Kindle everywhere, which means I always have something to do when I’m in a waiting room. And getting into a warm bed with a good book is one of life’s singular great pleasures.

So do it. Read more books. Here are some ways to help you get started.

Read further @ LATimes





Spread the Word About a Book You Love

12 01 2018

10 of the 99 Ways to spread the word about a book you love

That first week of sales matters immensely.

1. Pre-order the book.
2. When the online store prompts you to, share that pre-order on social media.
3. Buy the book for other people.

Read (or at least start reading) the book.

This is necessary for many of the other steps, and also so you can make eye contact with your friend. (That said, your friend would probably prefer you buy the book and not read it, rather than not buying it at all.)

4. Read the book in public places.
5. Read other books inside this book so that it always looks as if you’re reading the book even when you’re not.
6. Get your book club to read the book.
7. Invite the author to your book club discussion, then blog or tweet about the experience.

Talk about the book.

8. Talk about it to everyone you know.
9. Talk about it in public places, perhaps slightly more loudly than is strictly necessary. (But not in the quiet car on the train. This will not evoke warm fluffy feeling towards the book.)
10. Mention the book when you’re commenting on Book Riot’s Inbox/Outbox posts. (Keep it non spammy and genuine though!)

Read further @ BookRiot