Out Now! BookIsh Plaza eZine SEPTEMBER 2017

1 09 2017

The SEPTEMBER issue of BookIsh Plaza eZine is out now!
BookIsh Plaza is your online bookshop for (Dutch)Caribbean literature.

In this issue:

·        Folklore from Aruba, Bonaire & Curaçao
·        Cuba on our Literary Mind
·        Dutch Caribbean Authors not know in the Caribbean
·        And much more ……….

Read & share the eZine. The next one will appear in September.

BOOKISH PLAZA eZINE nr.64 SEPTEMBER 2017

Visit BookIsh Plaza for our New Arrivals!

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Is Writing a Painful & Bloody Process

1 09 2017

WHY DOES ANYONE WRITE?

WRITING A NOVEL IS A PAINFUL AND BLOODY PROCESS

Writing a novel is a painful and bloody process that takes up all your free time, haunts you in the darkest hours of night and generally culminates in a lot of weeping over an ever-growing pile of rejection letters. Every novelist will have to go through this at least once and in some cases many times before they are published, and since publication itself brings no guarantee of riches or plaudits, it’s not unreasonable to ask what sort of a person would subject himself to such a thing.

Read further @ LiteraryHub





Out Now! BookIsh Plaza eZine JUNE 2017

15 06 2017

The JUNE issue of BookIsh Plaza eZine is out now!
BookIsh Plaza is your online bookshop for (Dutch)Caribbean literature.

In this issue:

  • Keti Koti Month
  • Good Reads on Enslavement & Liberation
  • Good Reads & New Books for the Summer
  • And much more ……….

Tis time we have an extra appendix with more information.
Read & share the eZine. The next one will appear in September.

BOOKISH PLAZA eZINE nr.63 JUNE 2017
APPENDIX BOOKISH PLAZA eZINE nr.63 JUNE 2017

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How Murakami began writing

5 06 2017

HARUKI MURAKAMI: THE MOMENT I BECAME A NOVELIST

One bright April afternoon in 1978, I attended a baseball game at Jingu Stadium, not far from where I lived and worked. It was the Central League season opener, first pitch at one o’clock, the Yakult Swallows against the Hiroshima Carp. I was already a Swallows fan in those days, so I sometimes popped in to catch a game—a substitute, as it were, for taking a walk.

Back then, the Swallows were a perennially weak team (you might guess as much from their name) with little money and no flashy big-name players. Naturally, they weren’t very popular. Season opener it may have been, but only a few fans were sitting beyond the outfield fence. I stretched out with a beer to watch the game. At the time there were no bleacher seats out there, just a grassy slope. The sky was a sparkling blue, the draft beer as cold as could be, and the ball strikingly white against the green field, the first green I had seen in a long while. The Swallows first batter was Dave Hilton, a skinny newcomer from the States and a complete unknown. He batted in the leadoff position. The cleanup hitter was Charlie Manuel, who later became famous as the manager of the Cleveland Indians and the Philadelphia Phillies. Then, though, he was a real stud, a slugger the Japanese fans had dubbed “the Red Demon.”

I think Hiroshima’s starting pitcher that day was Yoshiro Sotokoba. Yakult countered with Takeshi Yasuda. In the bottom of the first inning, Hilton slammed Sotokoba’s first pitch into left field for a clean double. The satisfying crack when the bat met the ball resounded throughout Jingu Stadium. Scattered applause rose around me. In that instant, for no reason and on no grounds whatsoever, the thought suddenly struck me: I think I can write a novel.

I can still recall the exact sensation. It felt as if something had come fluttering down from the sky, and I had caught it cleanly in my hands. I had no idea why it had chanced to fall into my grasp. I didn’t know then, and I don’t know now. Whatever the reason, it had taken place. It was like a revelation. Or maybe epiphany is the closest word. All I can say is that my life was drastically and permanently altered in that instant—when Dave Hilton belted that beautiful, ringing double at Jingu Stadium.

After the game (Yakult won as I recall), I took the train to Shinjuku and bought a sheaf of writing paper and a fountain pen. Word processors and computers weren’t around back then, which meant we had to write everything by hand, one character at a time. The sensation of writing felt very fresh. I remember how thrilled I was. It had been such a long time since I had put fountain pen to paper.

Read the whole article @ Literary Hub





Out Now! BookIsh Plaza eZine APRIL 2017

27 03 2017

The APRIL issue of BookIsh Plaza eZine is out now!
BookIsh Plaza is your online bookshop for (Dutch)Caribbean literature.

In this issue:

  • Commemorating 50 Years of Cien años de soledad
  • Overal opa’s en oma’s selected for the Dutch Kinderjury. Vote till April 19th!
  • Ode to St. Lucian Poet Derek Walcott
  • Poetry Night in Aruba
  • And much more news………

Read & share the eZine. The next one will appear in May.

BOOKISH PLAZA eZINE nr.61 APRIL 2017

Visit BookIsh Plaza for our New Arrivals!





How to Read More Books

27 03 2017


8 Ways to Read (a Lot) More Books This Year

How much do you read?

For most of my adult life I read maybe five books a year — if I was lucky. I’d read a couple on vacation and I’d always have a few slow burners hanging around the bedside table for months.

And then last year I surprised myself by reading 50 books. This year I’m on pace for 100. I’ve never felt more creatively alive in all areas of my life. I feel more interesting, I feel like a better father, and my writing output has dramatically increased. Amplifying my reading rate has been the domino that’s tipped over a slew of others.

I’m disappointed that I didn’t do it sooner.

Why did I wait 20 years?

Well, our world today is designed for shallow skimming rather than deep diving, so it took me some time to identify the specific changes that skyrocketed my reading rate. None of them had to do with how fast I read. I’m actually a pretty slow reader.

Here’s my advice for fitting more reading into your own life, based on the behaviors that I changed:

  1. Centralize reading in your home.
  2. Make a public commitment.
  3. Find a few trusted, curated lists.
  4. Change your mindset about quitting.
  5. Take a “news fast” and channel your reading dollars.
  6. Triple your churn rate.
  7. Read physical books.
  8. Reapply the 10,000 steps rule.

Read further @ Harvard Business Review

 





The Benefits of a Sensitivity Reader

27 03 2017

Sensitivity Readers Are A New Front Line In Helping Authors With Their Craft

What’s a well-meaning contemporary author seeking to portray a diverse world in her fiction to do? Several recent articles suggest a surprising answer: Hire a sensitivity reader to edit the manuscript.

In an excellent reported piece for Slate last week, Katy Waldman sketches out the uses and potential drawbacks of the practice. Sensitivity readers function as primary readers of a work in progress ― but while a traditional editor would read with a view for overall quality, a sensitivity reader focuses on the accuracy and potential offensiveness of a specific minority group’s portrayal. To ensure a Korean-American family is being depicted sensitively and authentically, an author might hire a Korean-American reader; to vet the characterization of a protagonist who uses a wheelchair, an author might hire a reader with the same disability.

Read further @ Huffington Post