Look Out for a Richer Reading Experience

6 02 2018

1. Wake up 15 minutes earlier than usual and use that time to read a poem.

2. Visit your library — especially if it’s been awhile — and ask a librarian for a recommendation.

3. Let go of one reading prejudice and never think about it again.

4. Read one book in a genre you think you despise.

5. Ask someone you respect for a book suggestion, and read it right away.

6. Give away the book that’s been on your TBR pile the longest.

7. Volunteer for an organization that promotes literacy.

8. Read a book that looks like it will make you feel uncomfortable.

9. Commit to a reading challenge.

10. Cull ten books from your collection and donate them without bringing any new books home.

11. Read out loud to someone you love.

12. Make a list of the ways reading intersects with love in your life.

13. Listen to the audiobook of a book you DNF’d years ago.

14. Read your best friend’s favourite book, no matter what it is.

15. Dog-ear a page.

16. Write in the margins.

17. Ask your oldest relative or friend their favourite book. Read it right away and tell them.

18. Read outside.

19. Listen to an audiobook while you run errands.

20. Read a play. Let yourself take the time to imagine how it might be staged.

21. Reread a book you hated in high school. Reread it twice.

22. Apologize to someone you’ve been snobby or snarky to about books.

23. Read a book by an author from a country you’ve never imagined visiting.

24. Read a collection of poetry by a single poet, front-to-back, twice.

25. Give your favourite book from childhood at the next baby shower you attend.

26. Give your favourite book from your 20s to your favourite college student.

27. Read a book by a person who doesn’t look like you.

28. Read a book by a person who wouldn’t understand you in a million years.

29. Read one page of a holy book from a faith you were not raised with.

30. Listen to a podcast about books.

31. Attend the next reading in your town, even (especially!) if you don’t know the author.

32. Write a handwritten letter to a living author you adore.

33. Visit the grave of a dead author you adore.

34. Visit a place you’ve only ever read about in books.

35. Crack a spine. Go on. Do it.

36. Read a superhero comic, especially if you haven’t in years (or ever).

37. Watch an adaptation of a book you like and try to like it for what it is.

38. Memorize a poem.

39. Reread the book you loved best when you were sixteen.

40. Have a conversation about books with someone you’ve never talked books with before.

Source: BookRiot





What makes a book successful?

1 02 2014

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More @ Gally Cat





Writing Fiction Tips

3 11 2012

5 Tips for Writing Historical Fiction

Conquistadora author Esmeralda Santiago and Cervantes Street author Jaime Manrique all joined a panel about writing historical fiction.

Throughout their talk, they shared these five handy tips for writers thinking about the genre.

1. Assemble a collection of art books from the period you are researching. Cut them up and interact with them to get ideas and draw feelings. This will help especially with character development.

2. Read other historical fiction books and identify techniques that could fit well for your own story.

3. Keep in mind that regardless of the time period, people don’t change very much in the ways they respond emotionally.

4. Research constantly.

5. Know the equivalents for linguistic expressions such as “D’uh!” and “Yo.” Use language that is accurate to the time period, but don’t force it. Bear in mind that the Oxford English Dictionary can be your best friend.

Can you add any more tips on writing historical fiction stories?

Source: Galleycat





Dialogue Between Literature & Genre

27 12 2011


Genre writes to Literature

A ‘private letter’ from popular fiction to its grander relation sweetly casts the two as rivals with a lot in common

I come to this a little late but I come to it with a smile I didn’t think would materialise this gloomy Monday morning. If you’re someone who, like me, gets grumpy about the pointlessness of the arbitrary split between literary fiction and genre, then you need to read SFF author Daniel Abraham’s “private letter from Genre to Literature”. It’s great.

“You were in the dark, plain clothes that you think of as elegant. I have always thought they made you look pale,” says Genre, mournfully, to Literature. “You laugh at me for telling the same stories again and again. I call you boring and joyless.”

 Literature, says Genre, takes Genre’s “most glorious moments” – Ursula LeGuin and Dashiell Hammett, Mary Shelley and Philip K Dick – and claims them for its own. “You say that they ‘transcend genre’. There are no more heartless words than those. You disarm me. You know, I think, that if we were to compare our projects honestly – my best to yours, my mediocrities to yours, our failures lumped together – this division between us would vanish, and so you skim away my cream and mock me for being only milk.”

Read full article @ The Guardian