Caribbean Women Writing at the Millennium

4 09 2012

One of the new books presented at the annual Caribbean Studies Association’s 2012 book launch organized by Faith Smith (Brandeis University), was Odile Ferly’s A Poetics of Relation: Caribbean Women Writing at the Millennium (Palgrave MacMillan 2012). [See full list of books launched in our previous post Caribbean Studies Association’s 2012 Book Launch.]

A Poetics of Relation: Caribbean Women Writing at the Millennium fosters a dialogue across islands and languages between established and lesser-known authors, bringing together archipelagic and diasporic voices from the Francophone and Hispanic Antilles. This study underscores the socio-cultural impact of emigration and the perpetual self-redefinition that results from this phenomenon. Without denying the enduring impact of former colonial divisions or minimizing the specificities to each bloc in the region, Ferly shows that a comparative analysis of female narratives is often most pertinent across linguistic zones.

ODILE FERLY is an associate professor of French and Francophone Studies at Clark University.

Source: Repeating Islands, June 2012





New publication: El Caribe literario, Trazados de convivencia

15 03 2012

A new collection of essays by Cuban scholar Emilio Jorge Rodríguez—El Caribe literario: Trazados de convivencia [The Literary Caribbean: Paths of Coexistence]—was recently published by Arte y Literatura publishers. This and several other books by this Cuban scholar are being introduced at the International Book Fair in Havana today.

This volume, by Cuban scholar and essayist Jorge Emilio Rodriguez, presents perspectives on various topics related to Caribbean issues. This varied collection studies the work of writers from the region, the relationship between Panama and the Antilles, the analysis of Caribbean journals that have helped disseminate regional literature and culture, and a tribute to the Festival of Fire that takes place every year in Santiago de Cuba, are some of the areas addressed in these “Paths of Coexistence,” to show the cultural confluence and the ecumenical dimension of the Caribbean.

Continue reading @ Repeating Islands





New Book on the Trans-Caribbean Literary Identity

17 02 2012

The newest book released here from House of Nehesi Publishers (HNP) is Haiti and Trans-Caribbean Literary Identity / Haití y la transcaribeñidad literaria by Emilio Jorge Rodríguez.

The English and Spanish title is “a remarkable collection of essays,” said Maximilien Laroche, noted Haitian author from Canada’s Université Laval.

The Dominican author and Syracuse University professor Silvio Torres-Saillant said that, “This work of Cuban colleague Emilio Jorge Rodríguez should be listed among the few books that can be said to truly advance the understanding of the subject they address.”

Topics covered are the Haitian novel in the 20th century and the search for Amerindian and African origins in the masterful work of Alejo Carpentier.

The subject of “Creole transgressions” between Haiti and the Dominican Republic is critically explored, and is sure to raise some eyebrows or even tempers but definitely imparting new intelligences, said Lasana M. Sekou, HNP projects director.

Then there’s an utterly rare and captivating discussion placing Cuba’s grand poet Nicolás Guillén on a visit to Haiti and at the “elite” center of the country’s debate on race and culture.

“The essential subject areas of Haiti and Trans-Caribbean Literary Identity are uniquely interpreted. I would dare say that this book is a missing link for most in our fuller knowledge and experiences of Caribbean literature and culture, of how we think and why we live as we do in this region,” said Sekou.

Continue reading @ Repeatings Islands





New Book on Migration and Displacement in Dominican Literature

17 02 2012

Danny Méndez’s Narratives of Migration and Displacement in Dominican Literature was published this month (February 2012) by Routledge.

Establishing an interdisciplinary connection between Migration Studies, Post-Colonial Studies and Affect Theory, Méndez analyzes the symbolic interplay between emotions, cognitions, and displacement in the narratives written by and about Dominican and Dominican-Americans in the United States and Puerto Rico. He argues that given the historic place of creolization as a marker of national, cultural, and social development in the Caribbean and particularly the Dominican Republic, this cultural process is not magically annulled in Caribbean immigrations to the U.S. Instead, this book illustrates the numerous ways in which Dominicans’ subjective interpretation of their experiences of migration and incorporation into U.S. society, seen through the filter of multiple creolizations of the past, are woven into their written works as a series of variations on Americanness and Dominicanness.

Through close readings of selected writings by Pedro Henríquez Ureña, José Luis González, Junot Díaz, Josefina Báez, Loida Maritza Pérez among others, Méndez argues that emotional creolizations operate as a psychological parameter on immigrant populations as they negotiate their transcultural status against the ideological norms of assimilation in their new host country. Consequently, he proposes that this emotional creolization is dialectical — that is, it not only affects diasporic populations, but also changes the norms and terms of assimilation as well.

Continue reading @ Repeating Islands





New book in the Caribbean Literary Studies

1 02 2012

The New World Studies Series published by University of Virginia Press has established itself as the top academic series in Caribbean literary studies. One of the most recent publications is Raphael Dalleo’s Caribbean Literature and the Public Sphere.

Bringing together the most exciting recent archival work in anglophone, francophone, and hispanophone Caribbean studies, Raphael Dalleo constructs a new literary history of the region that is both comprehensive and innovative. He examines how changes in political, economic, and social structures have produced different sets of possibilities for writers to imagine their relationship to the institutions of the public sphere. In the process, he provides a new context for rereading such major writers as Mary Seacole, José Martí, Jacques Roumain, Claude McKay, Marie Chauvet, and George Lamming while also drawing lesser-known figures into the story. Dalleo’s comparative approach will be important to Caribbeanists from all of the region’s linguistic traditions, and his book contributes even more broadly to debates in Latin American and postcolonial studies about postmodernity and globalization.

 




Painting Away Regrets with Opal Palmer Adisa

11 01 2012

Jamaican born Opal Palmer Adisa’s new novel, Painting Away Regrets was recently published by Peepal Tree Press (2011).

Christine and Donald are two modern, urban professionals, fundamentally unsuited to one another, caught in the currents of life, and bound by the one thing they have in common–powerful sexual desires. They meet in graduate school at Berkeley and become consumed by the amazing sexual chemistry they share. Marriage and four children later, Christine and Donald are at a crossroads. Moving easily between the Caribbean, Africa and the USA, the novel dances between the real-life drama that unfolds between Christine and Donald, and the spiritual world of the Orishas where every human act has a spiritual ramification.

Gail Tsukiyama (author of The Samurai’s Garden and The Street of a Thousand Blossoms) writes: “Rich in the vibrant rhythms and colors of the Caribbean, Painting Away Regrets, is a song that resonates the redeeming power of love and family. Opal Palmer Adisa’s storytelling shines in the lush island folklore; in this story of one woman’s spiritual and sensual journey towards healing and forgiveness.”

[The book cover features LeRoy Clarke’s painting “Arima Mama.”]

Opal Palmer Adisa holds a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. She is a Jamaica-born, award-winning poet, and professor of creative writing and literature at the California College of the Arts, and her work has appeared in more than 200 journals, anthologies, and other publications. She is also the author of numerous poetry and short story collections. Her first novel was It Begins with Tears.

Source: Repeating Islands, dec 2011





New Collection of Short Stories on Jamaican Society

10 01 2012

Parable of the Mangoes, a new collection of short stories by Jamaica’s Jean Goulbourne

As poet and novelist, Jean L. Goulbourne writes about the distress, anger, struggle and creativity which she witnesses in Jamaican society from the perspective of a historian and educator (she is a lecturer in History and Social Studies at Church Teachers’ College in Mandeville, Jamaica). Her writing is poetic, economical, pungent and stimulating, and she has received several writing awards. Goulbourne recently published a collection of short stories called Parable of the Mangoes (Abeng Press, 2011). Here are two book reviews, the first by Jean Small and the second by Amazon.com. We thank Peter Jordens for the information in this post.

The Jamaica Cultural Development Commission’s 2010 gold medalist for short-story writing, Jean Goulbourne, has wasted no time in producing her newest collection of stories, Parable of the Mangoes, published by Abeng Press.

Born in Black River on Jamaica’s south coast, Jean developed a keen eye and ear for all that happened around her in rural Jamaica. These 12 stories express a love of the land, a commitment to the development of the nation, and a sympathetic and compassionate understanding of the lives of a people whose ancestors experienced the harsh circumstances of colonization and slavery.

Read full article @ Repeating Islands





Essays on Caribbean’s most versatile writer

8 12 2011

Lección errante: Mayra Santos Febres y el Caribe contemporáneo. Edited by Nadia V Celis and Juan Pablo Rivera. (San Juan, P.R.: Isla Negra Editores, 2011)

Lección errante: Mayra Santos Febres y el Caribe contemporáneo is the first book of critical essays on Mayra Santos-Febres, one of the Caribbean’s most versatile writers, and arguably the first Latin American Afro-Hispanic literary celebrity. The collection examines the unique poetic universe of Santos-Febres, populated by “wandering” beings such as immigrants, transvestites and sex-workers, whose fictional voices rise up against their long-standing socio-historic marginalization. Lección errante delves into Santos-Febres’ public persona, revealing her as an emblem of a new generation of Latin American writers who shuttle comfortably between fiction, poetry, and the scholarly essay; between printed media and virtual technologies; between the traditionally intellectual arena and the popular culture scene.

Read full article @ Repeating Islands





First Novel for Jamaican Writer Olive Senior

8 12 2011

Prize-winning Jamaican writer, Olive Senior, will launch her first novel, Dancing Lessons, on Sunday, December 11 at the University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona campus. The launch will be held at the Neville Hall Lecture Theatre and will begin at 11 a.m., Jamaica’s Gleaner reports.

Dancing Lessons is sad, satirical, hilarious, and ultimately redemptive. A novel infused with the cadences and colour of Jamaica yet connecting with anyone anywhere who engages with notions of family, love, loss, friendship and belonging.

This new novel is further acknowledgement of Senior’s prodigious talent.

Since publishing her first poetry collection, Talking of Trees in 1985, Senior has published three other well-received poetry collections. Gardening in the Tropics won the F.J. Bressani Literary Prize, while Over the Roofs of the World (2005) was shortlisted for Canada’s Governor General’s Literary Award and Cuba’s Casa de las Americas Prize, and Shell (2007) was shortlisted for the Pat Lowther Award.

Read full article @ Repeating Islands





Tomorrow Presentation Dutch Translation of Mars’ “Saisons sauvages”

23 11 2011

New Book: Dutch Translation of Kettly Mars’ “Saisons sauvages”

On November 24, 2011, starting at 8:00pm, Kettly Mars (Haiti) presents the Dutch translation of her novel Saisons sauvages [Wrede Seizoenen] at the MC Theatre’s Grote zaal (Great Hall) in Amsterdam. She will be joined by visual artist Natasja Kensmil and singer Shirma Rouse. The evening events will be led by journalist Tanja Fraai. Lucia Nankoe, novelist and critic is the curator for this evening. The event is free and open to the public.

Kettly Mars is one of the 2011 Prince Claus laureates. With the prize, the Prince Claus Fund honored her bold approach in addressing unconventional topics, which has given new impetus to Caribbean literature. At this event, Mars will read passages from the book and she will speak about some of the major themes highlighted in the text.

Saisons sauvages takes place in the Port-au-Prince of the 1960s and is framed within the François Duvalier era, where tontons macoutes systematically eliminate the regime’s opponents.

Read full article @ Repeating Islands

Soon available @ BookIsh Plaza





Poems Influenced by Calypso & Jazz

23 11 2011


New Book and Album: Anthony Joseph’s “Rubber Orchestras”

 

Rubber Orchestras is a new collection by Trinidadian–born British poet Anthony Joseph, released this month by Salt Publishing. It is also the title of Joseph’s third album with The Spasm Band, which was released earlier this year.

Taking its name from a poem by American surrealist Ted Joans, Rubber Orchestras is an energetic, sensuous and intriguing collection of poems, written over a period of four years with an (as yet) undisclosed method of composition the writer calls Liminalism. This collection was selected from 100 poems written using this method. This is the poets’ most radical work so far, in parts psychedelic, surrealist but always engaging. [. . .] The book is divided into three sections: Precious and Impossible — a selection of poems influenced in subject and style by calypso and jazz; The Colony of Light — poems concerning Caribbean history and society; and Grotesquerie, in which there are darker, more obscure poems.

Read full article @ Repeating Islands





Writings on Caribbean Women

23 11 2011

New Book: Helen Hernández Hormilla’s “Mujeres en crisis”

Helen Hernández Hormilla’s Mujeres en crisis: Aproximaciones a lo femenino en las narradoras cubanas de los noventa (Havana: Publicaciones Acuario, Centro Félix Varela, 2011), a new study on contemporary women’s writing in Cuba was launched at the UNEAC on October 24, 2011. The book was introduced by scholar Zaida Capote Cruz, author of the book’s prologue.

Journalist Hernández Hormilla won the UNEAC’s first prize for essay for this exploration of the representation of women in female narrative of the 1990s from the perspective of gender. Divided into three chapters “Puntos de partida” [Points of Departure], “En busca de una tradición de narradoras en Cuba” [In Search of a Women Writers’Tradition in Cuba], and “Paradigmas en conflicto: Representaciones de la mujer en la narrativa femenina de los noventa” [Conflicting Paradigms: Representations of Women in Female Narrative of the 1990s], the text also reviews the main conceptual tools of gender theory and feminist literary criticism on which the analysis is grounded, as well as the history of women’s writing on the island, linking it to the socio-historical particularities of each time period.

Read fulle article @ Repeating Islands





Booklaunch “Meerstemmig Verleden” on Dutch Slavery Past

5 11 2011

On tuesday November 15th the book Meerstemmig Verleden will be presented at 8.00 p.m. at De Nieuwe Liefde, Da Costakade 2, Amsterdam. There will be a debate on different representations of the Dutch slavery past (in response to the tv series De Slavernij), stories, music and cabaret.

The book is published by KIT Publishers and gives personal accounts of how people view slavery. It is the result of the project of the Foundation Colorful Past about Dutch slavery past.

Aruban poet/writer Quito Nicolaas is one of the persons interviewed. He emphasizes the responsibility of the Creole-Surinamese community in gathering personal stories of the slavery experience. Helga Fredison put the emancipation struggle of her famous great-uncle Anton de Kom and Eddy Caffé is still deeply connected to the Church where his great-grandfather worked as a slave. By accommodating these personal stories creates a nuanced picture of the legacy of the Dutch slavery past. A nuance that is lacking in debates. 

TICKETS are obtained @ De Nieuwe Liefde

“Meerstemmig Verleden” soon available @ BookIsh Plaza





“Kwelgeesten rond de kapokboom” Recently Launched

5 11 2011

Last Friday november 4th saw the booklaunch of Kwelgeesten rond de kapokboom by author Charlotte Doornhein and visual artist Frouwkje Smit who sketches with the crossover novel and the art video, exceptional stories that take place around a nature reserve in Curaçao where in ancient times Indians lived.

Doornheim is also the organisor of the Festival Literaire Tippel Zone on Curaçao. A festival that attracts thousands of visitors each year-young and old. The name Charlotte Doornhein guarantees mystery and innovation in art & literature.

Read full article (in Dutch) @ Caribe Magazine





New book by Puerto Rican Author to be Launched

5 11 2011

Booklaunch of LuzAzul, new novel by Antonio Aguado Charneco

The presentation will be made on Thursday, 10 November 2011, at the Center for Puerto Rico, at 7: 00 pm. LuzAzul, published under the label of Isla Negra Editores, involves in its plot vivid and ambiguous love, during the University strike of the year 2010.Antonio Aguado Charneco, a writer awarded by both national and international cultural institutions some of which are: UNESCO, the Puerto Rican Ateneo, the Institute for literature, Los Juegos Florales de San Germán and the circle of writers and poets Iberoamericanos.
 
Among others, Antonio Aguado Charneco has published the books Anacahuita: Florespinas (2006), Ouroboros: seis cuentos (1985), Bajarí Baracutey: El taíno de la cueva (1993), and Sendero umbrío (1997).
 
Read full article (in Spanish) @ Boreales
 




Booklaunch latest book by Dominican Writer

5 11 2011

New Book: Carmen Imbert-Brugal’s “Memorias de la Señora”

Dominican writer Carmen Imbert-Brugal will present her most recent book of short stories Memorias de la Señora (Editorial Santuario, 2011) at the XIV International Book Fair of Puerto Rico, which takes place from November 9-13, 2011. The presentation will take place on November 9, at 7:00pm, at the Poets Café at the Peace Pavilion (Luís Muñoz Rivera Park).

[Also see Puerto Rico’s XIV International Book Fair]

Read full article @ Repeating Islands





Disturbing Collection of Poems

5 11 2011

New Book: “Cadáver de bailarina”

Described as “a disturbing collection of poems, ideal to read before going to the bed (or the grave),” Cadáver de bailarina y otros poemas [Body of a Dancer and other poems] (Lulu, 2011) is a new book by Rosalina Martínez González.

Description: A dancer who returns from death to complete the mise-en-scène. Centuries-old night owls meditate about their craft: blood; oriental spirits who tell of their adventures from the body of their victims, and conversations with more or less famous dead people. Cadáver de bailarina y otros poemas reflects on various phenomena surrounding the death, dark feelings and emotions contained from the perspective of the beings that take center stage. A collection of poems of improbable post-mortem experiences, ideal to read before going to bed (or the grave).

Read full article @ Repeating Islands