Reading Multiple Books

6 02 2018

5 TIPS FOR READING MULTIPLE BOOKS AT THE SAME TIME

1. Read different genres
2. Read different books at different places
3. Read through different mediums
4. Read for your mood – not for your TBR list
5. Take all the time you need

Read further @ BookRiot

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Classic of the Dutch Caribbean Literature Reprinted

6 02 2018

DE ROTS DER STRUIKELING [Life’s Obstacles, ed.] is a classic from the Dutch Caribbean literature. The novel tells the story of Eddy Lejeune, who reflects on his turbulent life.

Eddy Lejeune comes in search for diamonds in Venezuela mysteriously to his end. The story is told in a journalistic manner and begins at the end of his life. Before that, his high school years are described, his growing up in a foster home, the war that overtakes him as a student, the war camp. Particularly his war experiences prove to be a major influence on his thinking.

For this book Boeli van Leeuwen from Curaçao was rewarded the Vijverberg Prize (the present Bordewijk Prize) in Holland. In 1983 he received the Cola Debrot prize, the most important Antillian cultural distinction, for his literary work.

For more news read it in our new BOOKISH PLAZA eZINE nr.69 FEBRUARY 2018 edition.
Just out now!

Visit BookIsh Plaza for our New Arrivals!





6 02 2018

How the internet changed the way we write – and what to do about it

The usual evolution of English has been accelerated online, leading to a less formal – but arguably more expressive – language than the one we use IRL. So use those emojis wisely …

English has always evolved – that’s what it means to be a living language – and now the internet plays a pivotal role in driving this evolution. It’s where we talk most freely and naturally, and where we generally pay little heed to whether or not our grammar is “correct”.

Should we be concerned that, as a consequence, English is deteriorating? Is it changing at such a fast pace that older generations can’t keep up? Not quite. At a talk in 2013, linguist David Crystal, author of Internet Linguistics, said: “The vast majority of English is exactly the same today as it was 20 years ago.” And his collected data indicated that even e-communication isn’t wildly different: “Ninety per cent or so of the language you use in a text is standard English, or at least your local dialect.”

It’s why we can still read an 18th-century transcript of a speech George Washington gave to his troops and understand it in its entirety, and why grandparents don’t need a translator when sending an email to their grandchildren.

Read further @ The Guardian





BookIsh People & Their Reading Distraction

6 02 2018

HOW TO CURE READER’S DISTRACTION

Definition

Reader’s Distraction refers to an illness specifically afflicting bookish people, and is characterized by the inability to get through one book without setting it down to pick up another. This disorder typically degenerates into a vicious cycle whereby a reader never finishes a book, but is constantly purchasing new ones.

People who suffer from Reader’s Distraction usually exhibit the following symptoms:

  • TBR and TBF (to be finished) stacks that go on for days
  • Bookmarks in almost every book owned, but never placed toward the end
  • Weekly or even daily book hauls
  • The inability to refuse a book sale
  • Complete ignorance of story conclusions
  • A leaning tower of bedside books

Read further for the treatment advice @ BookRiot





Look Out for a Richer Reading Experience

6 02 2018

1. Wake up 15 minutes earlier than usual and use that time to read a poem.

2. Visit your library — especially if it’s been awhile — and ask a librarian for a recommendation.

3. Let go of one reading prejudice and never think about it again.

4. Read one book in a genre you think you despise.

5. Ask someone you respect for a book suggestion, and read it right away.

6. Give away the book that’s been on your TBR pile the longest.

7. Volunteer for an organization that promotes literacy.

8. Read a book that looks like it will make you feel uncomfortable.

9. Commit to a reading challenge.

10. Cull ten books from your collection and donate them without bringing any new books home.

11. Read out loud to someone you love.

12. Make a list of the ways reading intersects with love in your life.

13. Listen to the audiobook of a book you DNF’d years ago.

14. Read your best friend’s favourite book, no matter what it is.

15. Dog-ear a page.

16. Write in the margins.

17. Ask your oldest relative or friend their favourite book. Read it right away and tell them.

18. Read outside.

19. Listen to an audiobook while you run errands.

20. Read a play. Let yourself take the time to imagine how it might be staged.

21. Reread a book you hated in high school. Reread it twice.

22. Apologize to someone you’ve been snobby or snarky to about books.

23. Read a book by an author from a country you’ve never imagined visiting.

24. Read a collection of poetry by a single poet, front-to-back, twice.

25. Give your favourite book from childhood at the next baby shower you attend.

26. Give your favourite book from your 20s to your favourite college student.

27. Read a book by a person who doesn’t look like you.

28. Read a book by a person who wouldn’t understand you in a million years.

29. Read one page of a holy book from a faith you were not raised with.

30. Listen to a podcast about books.

31. Attend the next reading in your town, even (especially!) if you don’t know the author.

32. Write a handwritten letter to a living author you adore.

33. Visit the grave of a dead author you adore.

34. Visit a place you’ve only ever read about in books.

35. Crack a spine. Go on. Do it.

36. Read a superhero comic, especially if you haven’t in years (or ever).

37. Watch an adaptation of a book you like and try to like it for what it is.

38. Memorize a poem.

39. Reread the book you loved best when you were sixteen.

40. Have a conversation about books with someone you’ve never talked books with before.

Source: BookRiot





How to gain a Bookish New Year

13 01 2018


1. Preorder one book per month (or every other month or every third month) for the new year. Enjoy the surprise of the gift you purchased for yourself when it arrives.

2. Pick a series of books from childhood you’ve always meant to read or want to revisit. Prioritize that reading experience.

3. Buy or make a new bookmark. You can also print yourself a new one, if you’d like.

4. Choose a new planner and set it up with not just your calendar, but also a to-be-read list and a read list. Get creative!

5. Treat yourself to a new tote bag for lugging your hauls to and from the public library.

Read further @ BookRiot





Some 2017 Highlights of Caribbean Literature

13 01 2018

Commemorating 50 years of CIEN  AÑOS DE SOLEDAD with an illustrated version

 

Writing a new Caribbean: a picture of the Caribbean, as seen by a new generation of writers and poets. Listen to this interesting BBC 4 radio broadcast –

 

– Haitian-American writer Ibi Zoboi was on the Young People’s Literature list of the 2017 National #Book Award Finalists with AMERICAN STREET

For more highlights and articles read it in our new BOOKISH PLAZA eZINE nr. 68 JANUARY 2018 edition.
Just out now!

Visit BookIsh Plaza for our New Arrivals!