How to Get (Young) People Reading

28 11 2018

                                                                                                  PHOTO: lITHUB.COM

WHAT ONE PERSON CAN DO TO GET PEOPLE READING

THE STORY OF ALVIN IRBY AND BARBERSHOP BOOKS

Alvin Irby never wanted to become a teacher, the same profession his mother held for over 30 years in the Little Rock, Arkansas school district in which he grew up. But the adults in Irby’s life saw potential in him that he couldn’t see in himself. “My high school principal, one day during my senior year, he told me, ‘You’re going to be a better principal than I ever was,’” Irby recalls. “And I remember looking at him and saying, ‘Never! I will never go into education!’”

Yet his principal proved prescient. Irby did go into education, and after teaching for several years, he founded Barbershop Books, a reading incentive program that connects young black boys, ages four to eight, to books in male-centered reading spaces. “Barbershop Books’ primary goal is to increase the out-of-school reading time among black boys and to help young black boys identify as readers,” Irby says. “A lot of reading programs are focused on reading skills. That’s not what Barbershop Books is about. Our program is about connecting fun books to a male-centered space, and involving black men in boys’ early reading experiences.”

The seeds for the idea were planted when Irby was a high school sophomore. “In tenth grade, I was in regular English class,” he says. “We were reading short stories and doing spelling lists. This is what we were doing in tenth grade English. And I remember being bored out of my mind.”

So he went to his guidance counselor and requested a more challenging class. “When I switched into this pre-AP class, one of the first things that I noticed when I looked around, or a question that popped in my head, was, ‘Where did all of these white people come from?’” Irby says. “My regular English class was all black. When I switched into this advanced class, all of a sudden, there were white kids everywhere. I didn’t even know they were in the school! And then I started to wonder, why are these classes divided along racial lines like this? What is that about?”

Read further @ Literary Hub





Is imagination necessary to read?

1 11 2018

                                                                                                           PHOTO: Camistok

CAN IMAGINATION GET IN THE WAY OF READING?

Some time ago, I was confronted with a major aspect of reading, something we aren’t conscious of. A friend of mine – a non-reader, by the way – explained to me how he could never get interested in reading. Simply because he had the worst difficulty ever: in his mind, he couldn’t imagine the universe, the characters’ physical qualities or any room that was being described in a book. Therefore, he eventually just gave up picking up books.

This intrigued me. So I started thinking about it. I’ve read books since I can remember, so I can say that my imagination is “well-exercised,” right? As readers, what can we say about these non-readers and the people who choose watching TV over reading? We say they choose to do so because they’re lazy – they refuse to use their imagination because “it’s so hard.” And that’s what popped into my head when I heard my friend complaining about this. But then, something stopped me.

Read further @ BookRiot





Deep-reading Process & Our Brain

30 09 2018

                                                                                              Photo: calmmoment.com

WHAT DOES IMMERSING YOURSELF IN
A BOOK DO TO YOUR BRAIN?

Only connect.

–E.M. Forster

The act of taking on the perspective and feelings of others is one of the most profound, insufficiently heralded contributions of the deep-reading processes. Proust’s description of “that fertile miracle of communication effected in solitude” depicts an intimate emotional dimension within the reading experience: the capacity to communicate and to feel with another without moving an inch out of our private worlds. This capacity imparted by reading—to leave and yet not leave one’s sphere—is what gave the reclusive Emily Dickinson what she called her personal “frigate” to other lives and lands outside her perch above Main Street in Amherst, Massachusetts.

The narrative theologian John S. Dunne described this process of encounter and perspective taking in reading as the act of “passing over,” in which we enter into the feelings, imaginings, and thoughts of others through a particular kind of empathy: “Passing over is never total but is always partial and incomplete. And there is an equal and opposite process of coming back to oneself.” It is a beautifully apt description for how we move from our inherently circumscribed views of the world to enter another’s and return enlarged. In Love’s Mind, his numinous book on contemplation, Dunne expanded Proust’s insight: “That ‘fruitful miracle of a communication effected in solitude’ may be already a kind of learning to love.” Dunne saw the paradox that Proust described within reading—in which communication occurs despite the solitary nature of the reading act—as an unexpected preparation for our efforts to come to know other human beings, understand what they feel, and begin to change our sense of who or what is “other.” For theologians such as John Dunne and writers such as Gish Jen, whose lifework illumines this principle in fiction and nonfiction alike, the act of reading is a special place in which human beings are freed from themselves to pass over to others and, in so doing, learn what it means to be another person with aspirations, doubts, and emotions that they might otherwise never have known.

read futher @ Literary Hub





Never Alone With Books

30 06 2018

A LIFE OF READING IS NEVER LONELY

Reading is at once a lonely and an intensely sociable act. The writer becomes your ideal companion—interesting, worldly, compassionate, energetic—but only if you stick with him or her for a while, long enough to throw off the chill of isolation and to hear the intelligent voice murmuring in your ear. No wonder Victorian parents used to read out loud to the whole family (a chapter of Dickens a night by the precious light of the single candle); there’s nothing lonely about laughing or crying together—or shrinking back in horror. Even if solitary, the reader’s inner dialogue with the writer—questioning, concurring, wondering, objecting, pitying—fills the empty room under the lamplight with silent discourse and the expression of emotion.

A really lovely reflection on the power of a reading life





On Reading According to a Writer

30 06 2018

EDMUND WHITE: READING IS A PASSPORT
TO THE WORLD

When I was a little child, my sister, who was nearly four years older, was astonished that Icouldn’t read. We were in my mother’s old Ford, driving around the main square of Hyde Park, and my sister pointed to a sign and said, “You honestly can’t read that?”

“No,” I said sullenly. “What does it say?”

“Graeter’s,” she announced triumphantly, the name of Cincinnati’s premier ice creammaker. “Can’t you see that? What does it say to you?” She wasn’t being mean; she was genuinely puzzled. Reading was a magical portal—once you passed through it, you couldn’t even imagine going back.

must have been four. Two years later could read, or at least “sound out” syllables (that was the method then). When I realized that I could interpret these hieroglyphics, I felt sofree, as if a whole new world had been opened to me. Now I could herar a chorus ofvoices, even those coming from other centuries and cultures. I was no longer bound to the squalid here and now, to my mother’s web-spinning of agreeable fantasies or my father’s sudden eruptions of rage, to the sweating summers of that age before airconditioning.

remember toddling into my mother’s room, where she was taking a perfumed bubble bath in the late afternoon. I announced (or maybe thought), “I’m free. I can read.”

Could I really have had such an improbable thought at age six? Or have just told myself that that thought occurred to me then? And yet remember my mother’s sweetness, the good smell, the afternoon sunlight, and my very real feeling of joyful liberation. And,quite concretely, reading has always struck me as a passport to the world, one in which characters are more real than actual people, where values are more intense than in the dim light of reality, where characters fly up into destinies rather than paddle around in ambiguity.

I felt like a blind person who’d just regained his sight. I was no longer a Cincinnatian butrather an earthling. If things were clearly written in English, there was no text that wasoff-limits. I never read the standard children’s classics. No Wind in the Willows. Onlyrecently did I get around to Treasure
Island.

Read further @ Literary Hub





Students & Reading

13 04 2018

HOW TO GET STUDENTS TO READ MORE

For as long as there have been books people have worried that the death of reading was imminent. We hear it all the timeteens don’t read anymore! But during my eleven years of teaching, I have encountered students who read with more discipline than many of the adults in their lives. I often see students carrying the latest Lamar Giles or A.S. King novel, reading at lunch, and joining our school library’s book club. So why do English teachers and school officials worry about getting students to read more?

ENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO DOWNLOAD THE SERIAL READER APP AND USE IT FOR TWENTY MINUTES A DAY

PROVIDE STUDENTS TIME DURING CLASS TO READ

  1. Assign reading time as a bell ringer. 
  2. Set the expectation that when students finish an       assignment early, they should take out a book.

LEAVE OFF AT A CLIFFHANGER

TELL THEM HOW CONTROVERSIAL IT IS

  1. First, I always tell them when a book has been challenged.
  2. Next, I’ll play the concerned adult.

Read further @ BookRiot

 





Tips to your booktime reading

13 04 2018

5 TIPS FOR CALM, COZY, COMFORTING BEDTIME READING

1. KEEP IT SHORT
2. KEEP IT LIGHT
3. HAPPY ENDINGS ONLY
4. MAKE IT A PAGE-TURNER…BUT
NOT TOO MUCH OF ONE
5. KEEP IT FAMILIAR

Read further @ BookRiot





Reading Multiple Books

6 02 2018

5 TIPS FOR READING MULTIPLE BOOKS AT THE SAME TIME

1. Read different genres
2. Read different books at different places
3. Read through different mediums
4. Read for your mood – not for your TBR list
5. Take all the time you need

Read further @ BookRiot





BookIsh People & Their Reading Distraction

6 02 2018

HOW TO CURE READER’S DISTRACTION

Definition

Reader’s Distraction refers to an illness specifically afflicting bookish people, and is characterized by the inability to get through one book without setting it down to pick up another. This disorder typically degenerates into a vicious cycle whereby a reader never finishes a book, but is constantly purchasing new ones.

People who suffer from Reader’s Distraction usually exhibit the following symptoms:

  • TBR and TBF (to be finished) stacks that go on for days
  • Bookmarks in almost every book owned, but never placed toward the end
  • Weekly or even daily book hauls
  • The inability to refuse a book sale
  • Complete ignorance of story conclusions
  • A leaning tower of bedside books

Read further for the treatment advice @ BookRiot





Look Out for a Richer Reading Experience

6 02 2018

1. Wake up 15 minutes earlier than usual and use that time to read a poem.

2. Visit your library — especially if it’s been awhile — and ask a librarian for a recommendation.

3. Let go of one reading prejudice and never think about it again.

4. Read one book in a genre you think you despise.

5. Ask someone you respect for a book suggestion, and read it right away.

6. Give away the book that’s been on your TBR pile the longest.

7. Volunteer for an organization that promotes literacy.

8. Read a book that looks like it will make you feel uncomfortable.

9. Commit to a reading challenge.

10. Cull ten books from your collection and donate them without bringing any new books home.

11. Read out loud to someone you love.

12. Make a list of the ways reading intersects with love in your life.

13. Listen to the audiobook of a book you DNF’d years ago.

14. Read your best friend’s favourite book, no matter what it is.

15. Dog-ear a page.

16. Write in the margins.

17. Ask your oldest relative or friend their favourite book. Read it right away and tell them.

18. Read outside.

19. Listen to an audiobook while you run errands.

20. Read a play. Let yourself take the time to imagine how it might be staged.

21. Reread a book you hated in high school. Reread it twice.

22. Apologize to someone you’ve been snobby or snarky to about books.

23. Read a book by an author from a country you’ve never imagined visiting.

24. Read a collection of poetry by a single poet, front-to-back, twice.

25. Give your favourite book from childhood at the next baby shower you attend.

26. Give your favourite book from your 20s to your favourite college student.

27. Read a book by a person who doesn’t look like you.

28. Read a book by a person who wouldn’t understand you in a million years.

29. Read one page of a holy book from a faith you were not raised with.

30. Listen to a podcast about books.

31. Attend the next reading in your town, even (especially!) if you don’t know the author.

32. Write a handwritten letter to a living author you adore.

33. Visit the grave of a dead author you adore.

34. Visit a place you’ve only ever read about in books.

35. Crack a spine. Go on. Do it.

36. Read a superhero comic, especially if you haven’t in years (or ever).

37. Watch an adaptation of a book you like and try to like it for what it is.

38. Memorize a poem.

39. Reread the book you loved best when you were sixteen.

40. Have a conversation about books with someone you’ve never talked books with before.

Source: BookRiot





Strategies to Help Struggling Young Readers

13 01 2018

Four Teaching Moves That Promote A Growth Mindset In All Readers

Reading can be a very fraught topic for parents, teachers and students. Strong reading skills are essential for accessing later curriculum, so teachers put a lot of emphasis on it early. But the pressure and angst of getting students reading on schedule can sap the joy out of an activity that many young children love. At its heart, reading is a way to access stories, which in turn make readers wonder about the world. In the race to get kids reading, it can be easy to treat reading like a procedure, instead of the complicated experience that it is.

Read further @ KQEDnews





Spread the Word About a Book You Love

12 01 2018

10 of the 99 Ways to spread the word about a book you love

That first week of sales matters immensely.

1. Pre-order the book.
2. When the online store prompts you to, share that pre-order on social media.
3. Buy the book for other people.

Read (or at least start reading) the book.

This is necessary for many of the other steps, and also so you can make eye contact with your friend. (That said, your friend would probably prefer you buy the book and not read it, rather than not buying it at all.)

4. Read the book in public places.
5. Read other books inside this book so that it always looks as if you’re reading the book even when you’re not.
6. Get your book club to read the book.
7. Invite the author to your book club discussion, then blog or tweet about the experience.

Talk about the book.

8. Talk about it to everyone you know.
9. Talk about it in public places, perhaps slightly more loudly than is strictly necessary. (But not in the quiet car on the train. This will not evoke warm fluffy feeling towards the book.)
10. Mention the book when you’re commenting on Book Riot’s Inbox/Outbox posts. (Keep it non spammy and genuine though!)

Read further @ BookRiot





How to Meet Your Reading Challenge Goal this Year

29 10 2017

5 TIPS TO HELP YOU REACH YOUR READING CHALLENGE GOAL THIS YEAR

Rebecca Renner comes with new strategies to help herself and other overly ambitious book worms who’ve bitten off more than they can chew. Tips to help you reach your reading challenge goal.

TIP #1: BUDDY UP AND GET SOME INSPIRATION

TIP #2: CUT YOUR GOAL UP INTO LITTLE BITE-SIZED GOALS

TIP #3: CARVE OUT SOME QUIET TIME EVERY DAY

TIP #4: ALWAYS HAVE A BOOK WITH YOU

TIP #5: READ A DIFFERENT KIND OF BOOK

Read further @ BookRiot





What is your reading position?

29 10 2017

THE FIVE READING POSITIONS, RANKED

Reading may take place in the mind, but there’s no denying there’s a physical component to it as well. Whatever reading position you choose is important. If you’re not comfortable, chances are you won’t be reading as long or digesting the story as well. Here are five of the most common reading positions, ranked from best to worst. Which ones do you prefer?

1. SITTING – THE OLD STANDBY

2. SUPINE – THE FAVORITE   

3. STANDING – THE NECESSITY

4. SIDE – A NICE CHANGE OF PACE

5. PRONE – ONLY WHEN YOU HAVE TO

BONUS: UPSIDE DOWN – WORTH A TRY

Read further @ BookRiot





Out Now! BookIsh Plaza eZine SEPTEMBER 2017

1 09 2017

The SEPTEMBER issue of BookIsh Plaza eZine is out now!
BookIsh Plaza is your online bookshop for (Dutch)Caribbean literature.

In this issue:

·        Folklore from Aruba, Bonaire & Curaçao
·        Cuba on our Literary Mind
·        Dutch Caribbean Authors not know in the Caribbean
·        And much more ……….

Read & share the eZine. The next one will appear in September.

BOOKISH PLAZA eZINE nr.64 SEPTEMBER 2017

Visit BookIsh Plaza for our New Arrivals!





Hard-Core Readers’ Nightmare

1 09 2017

10 OBNOXIOUS THINGS PEOPLE SAY TO HARD-CORE READERS

Must have a big laugh of these people who are non-readers. Don’t know what they miss.

1. All that reading will destroy your eyes.

2. You’re going to spend all of your money on books and then you’ll starve and you can’t eat books, now can you.

3. You read books outside of class?

4. You read books for fun? What kind of masochist are you?

5. Oh, you read War and Peace? Weeeelllll, guess you’re too smart for me to talk to, huh?!

6. You know, those poor trees would still be on this planet supplying us with oxygen if it weren’t for you and your kind.

7. Why waste time reading books when you could be doing other things? Important things? Like following the latest celebrity gossip.

8. What are you, some kind of nerd?

9. You’ll have to buy a bigger house to fit all those books he heh heh heh heh heh *guffaw*.

10. You should stick to the realworld.

Source: BookRiot





Read a Book in a Week

5 06 2017

It may sound difficult, but the secret to reading a book every week is to not be precious about it. A few Tips & Tricks:

  • Don’t read before bed, read before work
  • Take advantage of your commute
  • Read on your phone

Read further @ GQ