Read a Book in a Week

5 06 2017

It may sound difficult, but the secret to reading a book every week is to not be precious about it. A few Tips & Tricks:

  • Don’t read before bed, read before work
  • Take advantage of your commute
  • Read on your phone

Read further @ GQ

 





More Reading Done in 2017?

28 04 2017

8 Easy Ways To Get More Reading Done In 2017

  1. Curate That TBR Pile Mindfully
  2. Invoke The Pomodoro Method
  3. Binge Read
  4. Join A Book Club
  5. Set A Goodreads Reading Challenge
  6. Do As Rory Gilmore Did
  7. Consider The Audiobook
  8. Use Your Tech-Free Time Mindfully

Read furter @ Bustle





How to Read More Books

27 03 2017


8 Ways to Read (a Lot) More Books This Year

How much do you read?

For most of my adult life I read maybe five books a year — if I was lucky. I’d read a couple on vacation and I’d always have a few slow burners hanging around the bedside table for months.

And then last year I surprised myself by reading 50 books. This year I’m on pace for 100. I’ve never felt more creatively alive in all areas of my life. I feel more interesting, I feel like a better father, and my writing output has dramatically increased. Amplifying my reading rate has been the domino that’s tipped over a slew of others.

I’m disappointed that I didn’t do it sooner.

Why did I wait 20 years?

Well, our world today is designed for shallow skimming rather than deep diving, so it took me some time to identify the specific changes that skyrocketed my reading rate. None of them had to do with how fast I read. I’m actually a pretty slow reader.

Here’s my advice for fitting more reading into your own life, based on the behaviors that I changed:

  1. Centralize reading in your home.
  2. Make a public commitment.
  3. Find a few trusted, curated lists.
  4. Change your mindset about quitting.
  5. Take a “news fast” and channel your reading dollars.
  6. Triple your churn rate.
  7. Read physical books.
  8. Reapply the 10,000 steps rule.

Read further @ Harvard Business Review

 





Date a Reader

11 03 2017

7 REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD DATE A READER

1.Readers are less stressed
2.Readers have more empathy
3.Readers have a great memory
4.Readers have a big, um, vocabulary
5.Readers are passionate
6.You know what gift to give a reader
7.Readers are better at sex

Read further @ BookRiot





INFOGRAPHIC: How the World Reads

7 12 2016

global-reading-habits-infographic-galleycatSource: GalleyCat





The First 10 out of 100 Must-read Second Novels

29 10 2016

romance-revisit-seamus_wide-f61966eec4bcbadc064dba59160c08c97dbad785-s1700-c85

The first ten of the 100 must-read second novels. Not the debut, but the follow-ups. And I must say some of these I’ve read are amazing. Pride & Prejudice I’ve read in my teens and I find it still enticing. And In Time of the Butterflies, brings me to the reality of our region of the Caribbean. Which is your favorite one?

  1. No Longer at Ease by Chinua Achebe
  2. At Night We Walk in Circles by Daniel Alarcón
  3. The Hummingbird’s Daughter by Luis Alberto Urrea
  4. In the Time of the Butterflies by Julia Álvarez
  5. Surfacing by Margaret Atwood
  6. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  7. Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin
  8. Sister of My Heart by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni
  9. City of Thieves by David Benioff
  10. The Teleportation Accident by Ned Beauman

Read further for the rest @ BookRiot

 





Celebrate Books Like the Oscars

3 06 2016

Lisa Lucas, publisher of Guernica magazine, will take over as executive director of the National Book Foundation on March 14

Head of the National Foundation, wants you to love reading

Lisa Lucas is a rare combination: a high-energy bookish extrovert.

“If I can convince a small fraction of people to feel the same way that I feel about reading,” she said, “then I’ve done my job.”

“People who like movies watch the Oscars,” she said. “Why don’t we celebrate books in the same way?”

Her Wall Street office was lined with nearly bare bookshelves, and the hallway outside was filled with outgoing boxes of books. In two weeks publishers would begin flooding the foundation with submissions for the 2016 National Book Awards, which have been given in various forms since 1950. The National Book Foundation was created to manage the awards and its annual November ceremony.

“For me, it has always felt like the Oscars of books,” she said. “I think that we need more people to feel like that.”

The National Book Awards, after all, gave its young adult literature prize to Sherman Alexie’s “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian,” despite sometimes controversial subject matter; it’s the prize that brought Patti Smith to tears when her memoir, “Just Kids,” won the nonfiction prize, and was met with a surge of social media delight when Ta-Nehisi Coates’ “Between the World and Me” received the nonfiction prize in 2015. Novelists William Faulkner, Bernard Malamud, John Updike and Philip Roth won the fiction prize more than once.

Read further @ LATimes