Reading Multiple Books

6 02 2018

5 TIPS FOR READING MULTIPLE BOOKS AT THE SAME TIME

1. Read different genres
2. Read different books at different places
3. Read through different mediums
4. Read for your mood – not for your TBR list
5. Take all the time you need

Read further @ BookRiot

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BookIsh People & Their Reading Distraction

6 02 2018

HOW TO CURE READER’S DISTRACTION

Definition

Reader’s Distraction refers to an illness specifically afflicting bookish people, and is characterized by the inability to get through one book without setting it down to pick up another. This disorder typically degenerates into a vicious cycle whereby a reader never finishes a book, but is constantly purchasing new ones.

People who suffer from Reader’s Distraction usually exhibit the following symptoms:

  • TBR and TBF (to be finished) stacks that go on for days
  • Bookmarks in almost every book owned, but never placed toward the end
  • Weekly or even daily book hauls
  • The inability to refuse a book sale
  • Complete ignorance of story conclusions
  • A leaning tower of bedside books

Read further for the treatment advice @ BookRiot





Look Out for a Richer Reading Experience

6 02 2018

1. Wake up 15 minutes earlier than usual and use that time to read a poem.

2. Visit your library — especially if it’s been awhile — and ask a librarian for a recommendation.

3. Let go of one reading prejudice and never think about it again.

4. Read one book in a genre you think you despise.

5. Ask someone you respect for a book suggestion, and read it right away.

6. Give away the book that’s been on your TBR pile the longest.

7. Volunteer for an organization that promotes literacy.

8. Read a book that looks like it will make you feel uncomfortable.

9. Commit to a reading challenge.

10. Cull ten books from your collection and donate them without bringing any new books home.

11. Read out loud to someone you love.

12. Make a list of the ways reading intersects with love in your life.

13. Listen to the audiobook of a book you DNF’d years ago.

14. Read your best friend’s favourite book, no matter what it is.

15. Dog-ear a page.

16. Write in the margins.

17. Ask your oldest relative or friend their favourite book. Read it right away and tell them.

18. Read outside.

19. Listen to an audiobook while you run errands.

20. Read a play. Let yourself take the time to imagine how it might be staged.

21. Reread a book you hated in high school. Reread it twice.

22. Apologize to someone you’ve been snobby or snarky to about books.

23. Read a book by an author from a country you’ve never imagined visiting.

24. Read a collection of poetry by a single poet, front-to-back, twice.

25. Give your favourite book from childhood at the next baby shower you attend.

26. Give your favourite book from your 20s to your favourite college student.

27. Read a book by a person who doesn’t look like you.

28. Read a book by a person who wouldn’t understand you in a million years.

29. Read one page of a holy book from a faith you were not raised with.

30. Listen to a podcast about books.

31. Attend the next reading in your town, even (especially!) if you don’t know the author.

32. Write a handwritten letter to a living author you adore.

33. Visit the grave of a dead author you adore.

34. Visit a place you’ve only ever read about in books.

35. Crack a spine. Go on. Do it.

36. Read a superhero comic, especially if you haven’t in years (or ever).

37. Watch an adaptation of a book you like and try to like it for what it is.

38. Memorize a poem.

39. Reread the book you loved best when you were sixteen.

40. Have a conversation about books with someone you’ve never talked books with before.

Source: BookRiot





How to gain a Bookish New Year

13 01 2018


1. Preorder one book per month (or every other month or every third month) for the new year. Enjoy the surprise of the gift you purchased for yourself when it arrives.

2. Pick a series of books from childhood you’ve always meant to read or want to revisit. Prioritize that reading experience.

3. Buy or make a new bookmark. You can also print yourself a new one, if you’d like.

4. Choose a new planner and set it up with not just your calendar, but also a to-be-read list and a read list. Get creative!

5. Treat yourself to a new tote bag for lugging your hauls to and from the public library.

Read further @ BookRiot





Some 2017 Highlights of Caribbean Literature

13 01 2018

Commemorating 50 years of CIEN  AÑOS DE SOLEDAD with an illustrated version

 

Writing a new Caribbean: a picture of the Caribbean, as seen by a new generation of writers and poets. Listen to this interesting BBC 4 radio broadcast –

 

– Haitian-American writer Ibi Zoboi was on the Young People’s Literature list of the 2017 National #Book Award Finalists with AMERICAN STREET

For more highlights and articles read it in our new BOOKISH PLAZA eZINE nr. 68 JANUARY 2018 edition.
Just out now!

Visit BookIsh Plaza for our New Arrivals!





The Rule is Don’t Write a Novel

12 01 2018

THE FIRST RULE OF NOVEL-WRITING IS DON’T WRITE A NOVEL

ELIZABETH PERCER: NINE NON-RULES FOR WRITING

If you’d asked me 15 years ago how I saw my future, I would tell you about all the hard work I’d put into earning my doctorate, about the post doc that promised me a way into a fantastic research opportunity; about the tenure track position I hoped to secure one day. I would tell you all this with a clenched jaw, a fierce smile, and a knot in my belly. Because although I’d spent most of my young life envisioning academic achievement as the pinnacle of success and fulfillment, these goals were forged from a lifetime of trying to measure up. I’d shoved my quirky, not particularly scientific self into a mold that suited my family of physicists, mathematicians, and software designers. But somehow along the way, in measuring myself against those I loved and admired, I forgot to check in to see if there was a form within me that was more essential and less shapely, to see if I had measures of my own to follow.

It wouldn’t be until after several life-altering events—most notably, the birth of my three children in somewhat rapid succession—that I would slowly relinquish my grasp on borrowed titles. Once liberated, however, I found myself in the distinctly uncomfortable position of realizing that original compositions are so much harder to develop than derivative ones, not least because they don’t have the same examples to follow.

Still, like any good academic, I tried for years to work at my writing the same way I’d worked at anything. I pushed myself. I was stern with myself. I created strict rules to follow and chastised myself when I didn’t follow them. When that didn’t work, I looked to experts, who told me that I needed to write for about the same time every day in the same place, or that I should seriously consider getting an MFA, or that I should seriously consider not getting an MFA, or who told me that only the most talented writers could succeed, or that true creative talent would never realize any kind of commercial success, or who told me I was too young, or too old. It’s no wonder that in looking for others to tell me how I needed to be, I got into the habit of showing up to my writing at the same time in the same place and freeze

1.  Don’t write a novel
2. Keep your publishing dreams in check
3. Writing doesn’t always look like writing
4. Books do not respond to timelines, spreadsheets, or graphs
5.  Make space for what comes
6.  Procrastinate
7.  Get to Know the Demons on Your Block
8.  Go Gentle into that Dark Night
9.  Don’t Neglect the Rest of You

Read further @ Literary Hub





Read More Books in 2018

12 01 2018


It’s resolution time! Indeed it is. How many am I going to read this time around. Set my goals on 30 on GoodReads. Last year it was 20 and I succeeded. Purely literature, no non-fiction that has to do with work. So I stepped up my reading. What’s your reading resolution for this year?
Let see what Jessica Roy advices us over at LATimes.

—————–

It’s resolution time.
Will this be the year you hit the treadmill for an hour every day, make all your meals at home, learn a new language and max out your retirement savings accounts? Perhaps. But more often than not, New Year’s resolutions are abandoned before the first gym payment goes through on your credit card.

This year, make a better resolution: Read more books. In fact, think of it less as a resolution, and more as a belated holiday gift to yourself.

Reading more was my resolution back in 2013. I realized I’d read maybe three books in the previous year. I joined Goodreads, a social media site for book lovers and got an L.A. Public Library card. I asked for an e-reader for Christmas that year. I joined a book club.

I set a goal to read 36 books. I wasn’t too hard on myself as to what counted as reading a book. Audiobooks counted. Cookbooks counted, if I had read through most of the recipes. Graphic novels and comic books counted. Books I got halfway through and then abandoned for lack of interest counted.

Getting back into reading books has been one of the singularly most rewarding things I have done for myself in my adult life. I carry my Kindle everywhere, which means I always have something to do when I’m in a waiting room. And getting into a warm bed with a good book is one of life’s singular great pleasures.

So do it. Read more books. Here are some ways to help you get started.

Read further @ LATimes