How to Read More Books

27 03 2017


8 Ways to Read (a Lot) More Books This Year

How much do you read?

For most of my adult life I read maybe five books a year — if I was lucky. I’d read a couple on vacation and I’d always have a few slow burners hanging around the bedside table for months.

And then last year I surprised myself by reading 50 books. This year I’m on pace for 100. I’ve never felt more creatively alive in all areas of my life. I feel more interesting, I feel like a better father, and my writing output has dramatically increased. Amplifying my reading rate has been the domino that’s tipped over a slew of others.

I’m disappointed that I didn’t do it sooner.

Why did I wait 20 years?

Well, our world today is designed for shallow skimming rather than deep diving, so it took me some time to identify the specific changes that skyrocketed my reading rate. None of them had to do with how fast I read. I’m actually a pretty slow reader.

Here’s my advice for fitting more reading into your own life, based on the behaviors that I changed:

  1. Centralize reading in your home.
  2. Make a public commitment.
  3. Find a few trusted, curated lists.
  4. Change your mindset about quitting.
  5. Take a “news fast” and channel your reading dollars.
  6. Triple your churn rate.
  7. Read physical books.
  8. Reapply the 10,000 steps rule.

Read further @ Harvard Business Review

 





The Benefits of a Sensitivity Reader

27 03 2017

Sensitivity Readers Are A New Front Line In Helping Authors With Their Craft

What’s a well-meaning contemporary author seeking to portray a diverse world in her fiction to do? Several recent articles suggest a surprising answer: Hire a sensitivity reader to edit the manuscript.

In an excellent reported piece for Slate last week, Katy Waldman sketches out the uses and potential drawbacks of the practice. Sensitivity readers function as primary readers of a work in progress ― but while a traditional editor would read with a view for overall quality, a sensitivity reader focuses on the accuracy and potential offensiveness of a specific minority group’s portrayal. To ensure a Korean-American family is being depicted sensitively and authentically, an author might hire a Korean-American reader; to vet the characterization of a protagonist who uses a wheelchair, an author might hire a reader with the same disability.

Read further @ Huffington Post





Date a Reader

11 03 2017

7 REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD DATE A READER

1.Readers are less stressed
2.Readers have more empathy
3.Readers have a great memory
4.Readers have a big, um, vocabulary
5.Readers are passionate
6.You know what gift to give a reader
7.Readers are better at sex

Read further @ BookRiot





Thoughts on Books & Reading

1 03 2017

imagesTHIRTY-THREE THOUGHTS (PLUS A FEW QUESTIONS) ON BOOKS AND READING

What are your thoughts on books and reading? Why do you read? I mean what do you hold to be self-evident and true about books and reading? Here are some thoughts on books, reading, and their importance.

  1. Passports facilitate travel outside of one’s country of citizenship. Books are my passport to any point and place in time and space, whether real, imagined, or somewhere in between. It is why I named my blog Passport Books.
  1. Books allow us to play dress up but without actually having to change clothes, hair, or makeup, which is great because I’m partial to jeans, tee shirts, minimally fussed with hair, and a little gloss.
  1. In a book you can be anything, in any place, at any time.
  1. Imagination is what separates human beings from inanimate objects.
  1. With imagination all things are possible.

Read further @ Book Riot





The New Way to Read

17 02 2017

readwalking

READWALKING: A READER IN MOTION

Reading in motion is nothing new or surprising. Many of us read while moving. The most common place is probably public transportation – subways, trains, buses, unicorns, however it is we get to work or wherever we’re going. But reading while walking still gets me stared at more often than not.

Not only stared at, but talked to. People seem to think that reading while I walk is an invitation to converse with me. They ask me how the book is. They ask me whether I really like it. They ask me what chapter I’m on (in the tone of voice that makes me know they haven’t even looked at the cover and haven’t read the book and have no idea whether it has chapters or not). They also tell me to be careful. Constantly, I’m told to look where I’m going, to watch out, to be careful.

Read further @ Book Riot





INFOGRAPHIC: How the World Reads

7 12 2016

global-reading-habits-infographic-galleycatSource: GalleyCat





Celebrate Books Like the Oscars

3 06 2016

Lisa Lucas, publisher of Guernica magazine, will take over as executive director of the National Book Foundation on March 14

Head of the National Foundation, wants you to love reading

Lisa Lucas is a rare combination: a high-energy bookish extrovert.

“If I can convince a small fraction of people to feel the same way that I feel about reading,” she said, “then I’ve done my job.”

“People who like movies watch the Oscars,” she said. “Why don’t we celebrate books in the same way?”

Her Wall Street office was lined with nearly bare bookshelves, and the hallway outside was filled with outgoing boxes of books. In two weeks publishers would begin flooding the foundation with submissions for the 2016 National Book Awards, which have been given in various forms since 1950. The National Book Foundation was created to manage the awards and its annual November ceremony.

“For me, it has always felt like the Oscars of books,” she said. “I think that we need more people to feel like that.”

The National Book Awards, after all, gave its young adult literature prize to Sherman Alexie’s “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian,” despite sometimes controversial subject matter; it’s the prize that brought Patti Smith to tears when her memoir, “Just Kids,” won the nonfiction prize, and was met with a surge of social media delight when Ta-Nehisi Coates’ “Between the World and Me” received the nonfiction prize in 2015. Novelists William Faulkner, Bernard Malamud, John Updike and Philip Roth won the fiction prize more than once.

Read further @ LATimes