Is imagination necessary to read?

1 11 2018

                                                                                                           PHOTO: Camistok

CAN IMAGINATION GET IN THE WAY OF READING?

Some time ago, I was confronted with a major aspect of reading, something we aren’t conscious of. A friend of mine – a non-reader, by the way – explained to me how he could never get interested in reading. Simply because he had the worst difficulty ever: in his mind, he couldn’t imagine the universe, the characters’ physical qualities or any room that was being described in a book. Therefore, he eventually just gave up picking up books.

This intrigued me. So I started thinking about it. I’ve read books since I can remember, so I can say that my imagination is “well-exercised,” right? As readers, what can we say about these non-readers and the people who choose watching TV over reading? We say they choose to do so because they’re lazy – they refuse to use their imagination because “it’s so hard.” And that’s what popped into my head when I heard my friend complaining about this. But then, something stopped me.

Read further @ BookRiot





Read More Books in 2018

12 01 2018


It’s resolution time! Indeed it is. How many am I going to read this time around. Set my goals on 30 on GoodReads. Last year it was 20 and I succeeded. Purely literature, no non-fiction that has to do with work. So I stepped up my reading. What’s your reading resolution for this year?
Let see what Jessica Roy advices us over at LATimes.

—————–

It’s resolution time.
Will this be the year you hit the treadmill for an hour every day, make all your meals at home, learn a new language and max out your retirement savings accounts? Perhaps. But more often than not, New Year’s resolutions are abandoned before the first gym payment goes through on your credit card.

This year, make a better resolution: Read more books. In fact, think of it less as a resolution, and more as a belated holiday gift to yourself.

Reading more was my resolution back in 2013. I realized I’d read maybe three books in the previous year. I joined Goodreads, a social media site for book lovers and got an L.A. Public Library card. I asked for an e-reader for Christmas that year. I joined a book club.

I set a goal to read 36 books. I wasn’t too hard on myself as to what counted as reading a book. Audiobooks counted. Cookbooks counted, if I had read through most of the recipes. Graphic novels and comic books counted. Books I got halfway through and then abandoned for lack of interest counted.

Getting back into reading books has been one of the singularly most rewarding things I have done for myself in my adult life. I carry my Kindle everywhere, which means I always have something to do when I’m in a waiting room. And getting into a warm bed with a good book is one of life’s singular great pleasures.

So do it. Read more books. Here are some ways to help you get started.

Read further @ LATimes





Wanna Be a Writer?

5 06 2017

HOW TO BE A WRITER: 10 TIPS

  1. Write
  2. Remember writing is not typing
  3. Read. And don’t read
  4. Listen. Don’t listen
  5. Find a vocation
  6. Time
  7. Facts
  8. Joy
  9. What we call success is very nice and comes with useful byproducts, but succes is not love
  10. It’s all really up to you

Read further @ Literary Hub





Read a Book in a Week

5 06 2017

It may sound difficult, but the secret to reading a book every week is to not be precious about it. A few Tips & Tricks:

  • Don’t read before bed, read before work
  • Take advantage of your commute
  • Read on your phone

Read further @ GQ

 





How to Read More

28 04 2017

TIPS AND TRICKS FOR HOW TO READ MORE

When I talk about how I read a lot of books, people often ask me how I get so much reading done. Don’t you have a life? Are you a speed reader? No, and sort of. Like any mega-reader, it’s a mix of tricks to read more books. Here at Book Riot, our contributors have developed different methods to read more books. Read on for some of our favorite ways to fit more reading in your life.

Read further @ BookRiot





On the Importance of Kindness and Reading Widely

28 04 2017

COLUM MCCANN’S
ADVICE TO YOUNG WRITERS

I. Don’t Be a Dick

Three things in human life are important: the first is to be kind; the second is to be kind; and the third is to be kind.

–Henry James

II. Read, Read, Read

Trying to write without reading is like venturing out to sea all by yourself in a small boat: lonely and dangerous. Wouldn’t you rather see the horizon filled, end to end, with other sails? Wouldn’t you rather wave to neighboring vessels; admire their craftsmanship; cut in and out of the wakes that suit you, knowing that you’ll leave a wake of your own, and that there’s enough wind and sea for you all?

–Téa Obreht

Read further @ Literary Hub

 





How to Read More Books

27 03 2017


8 Ways to Read (a Lot) More Books This Year

How much do you read?

For most of my adult life I read maybe five books a year — if I was lucky. I’d read a couple on vacation and I’d always have a few slow burners hanging around the bedside table for months.

And then last year I surprised myself by reading 50 books. This year I’m on pace for 100. I’ve never felt more creatively alive in all areas of my life. I feel more interesting, I feel like a better father, and my writing output has dramatically increased. Amplifying my reading rate has been the domino that’s tipped over a slew of others.

I’m disappointed that I didn’t do it sooner.

Why did I wait 20 years?

Well, our world today is designed for shallow skimming rather than deep diving, so it took me some time to identify the specific changes that skyrocketed my reading rate. None of them had to do with how fast I read. I’m actually a pretty slow reader.

Here’s my advice for fitting more reading into your own life, based on the behaviors that I changed:

  1. Centralize reading in your home.
  2. Make a public commitment.
  3. Find a few trusted, curated lists.
  4. Change your mindset about quitting.
  5. Take a “news fast” and channel your reading dollars.
  6. Triple your churn rate.
  7. Read physical books.
  8. Reapply the 10,000 steps rule.

Read further @ Harvard Business Review

 





The First 10 out of 100 Must-read Second Novels

29 10 2016

romance-revisit-seamus_wide-f61966eec4bcbadc064dba59160c08c97dbad785-s1700-c85

The first ten of the 100 must-read second novels. Not the debut, but the follow-ups. And I must say some of these I’ve read are amazing. Pride & Prejudice I’ve read in my teens and I find it still enticing. And In Time of the Butterflies, brings me to the reality of our region of the Caribbean. Which is your favorite one?

  1. No Longer at Ease by Chinua Achebe
  2. At Night We Walk in Circles by Daniel Alarcón
  3. The Hummingbird’s Daughter by Luis Alberto Urrea
  4. In the Time of the Butterflies by Julia Álvarez
  5. Surfacing by Margaret Atwood
  6. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  7. Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin
  8. Sister of My Heart by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni
  9. City of Thieves by David Benioff
  10. The Teleportation Accident by Ned Beauman

Read further for the rest @ BookRiot

 





Guilty Pleasure Reads?

28 02 2015

dont-be-ashamed-to-read

Read what you want? What you like. No guilty pleasure. No shame. So read Scifi, Fantasy or Thriller & don’t be guilty about that. So do your own thing and enjoy your reads. Watch the video to know there’s no shame in that.





How to Avoid Writersblock

31 10 2014

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5 Ways To Find New Story Ideas

One of the questions authors are asked most often is how they get their ideas. Unfortunately, there isn’t a secret idea speakeasy where you can buy them in bulk (or if there is, no one has ever given me the password). There are, however, some steps you can take to generate new ideas when you’re feeling blocked. Here are five ways to find writing inspiration:

  1. Go for a Walk
  2. Practice FreeWriting
  3. Read Something
  4. Disconnect
  5. Observe & Record

For an elaboration on the five ways to find inspiration, read further @ Huffington Post.





Be a Better Writer by Reading

28 04 2014

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“It usually helps me write by reading — somehow the reading gear in your head turns the writing gear.” -Steven Wright

Reading is fashionable. Again. It’s cool. We bet you all can find many statements about how good and useful reading is, how much it can influence a person and his way of thinking, and how awesome it is to sit on your cozy sofa, reading your favorite book and diving (not literally of course) into this imaginary and so wonderful world…

And all such statements are true, actually. Many famous writers, singers, politicians, and even movie characters prove the fact of reading’s great influence on people’s mind: if you take a look at their bookshelves, you’ll definitely be surprised.

“If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.” -Stephen King

These words of the “Great Master” and famous American essayist can hardly be objected, taking into account his writing skills and his books’ importance for several generations of readers from different countries. Does it mean you should read a lot if you want to write like a professional? The answer to this question is quite predictable: yes, you should.

No good writing is possible without reading. Any proof needed? No problem.

How Reading Influences Your Writing

Being a writer, you’ll probably agree with the fact that the art of writing is nearly impossible to teach. It is impossible to finish some courses on creative writing or graduate from some university with a diploma of “a professional writer.” Do you consider it possible? We have bad news for you then.

Writing is a skill. But this skill is very complicated, because it can’t be got by simple learning of grammar rules, punctuation marks, and different writing techniques. Certainly, you should know how to write correctly, but only reading can help you achieve greatness. How?

  • It helps you find inspiration
  • It lets you gain new knowledge
  • It helps you learn your genre better
  • It provides you with wider vocabulary for your own works
  • It makes you understand the language better
  • It helps you learn from real gurus of writing
  • It helps you reveal the secrets of this job in practice

Can you imagine a musician who does not listen to music himself? The same question can be asked about writing. Every author writes for readers; no grammar rules and writing techniques will help you understand your reader if you do not read yourself.

Enjoy what you read. It is difficult and mostly impossible to write something really good if you did not experience anything good that had been written already. Being a writer yourself, you have an ace in your sleeve: you can read a book with an eye for writing, though you do not even realize it.

Everything you learn as a reader, you can use as a writer afterward. But even if becoming the second Ray Bradbury is not your plan, it is not a reason to forget about reading and consider it useless at once.

Read further @ the Huffington Post





Write a Novel the Easy Way

3 11 2012

How to Write a Novel in a Month (The Easy Way!)

November is National Novel Writing Month and in honor of that, Maya Rodale, author of smart and sassy romance novels shares her system (developed over the course of writing 10-plus books) for quickly producing a good novel without a ton of angst and anguish.

According to Rodale if cutting yourself off from the world (and Internet) at a five-star hotel with excellent room service is not an option, try the following:

  1. Know your characters. A novel won’t work without fully developed, compelling characters. Take the time to know the hero and heroines story before you start plotting or writing. You may never explicitly use this information in the text, but it will enhance your story.
  2. An outline is totally worth your time. I know, you want to start immediately and see where the muse leads you. Well, the muse is a trickster and may lead you down a dead end path. Or perhaps she’s using Apple Maps. With an outline, you know where you’re heading and have an idea of the route you’re going to take, which makes for a smoother journey. You can always take side trips.
  3. Draft #1: Focus on dialogue. Estimate word count: 40,000 The first draft of my novels is entirely dialogue. This is the most direct way to make sure your characters are telling the story and moving it forward. Unless it’s a multicharacter scene, I won’t even include tags like “he said” or “she said.” If you can’t tell when your hero or heroine is talking without identifying it, then it’s a sign you need to go back and work on their character and voice.
  4. Draft #2: Crank out everything else. Estimated word count: 65,000 This is another FAST draft full of description and everything else. It’s full of really awkward sentences and misplaced punctuation marks. I add lots of “TKs” (wherever something is “to come”) when I’m not sure of a word but just want to keep going.
  5. Print, read, make notes. Print out a copy and read it with a pen in hand. You’re not just looking for typos or ways to tighten your sentences, but also trying to figure out how the story hangs together before you write so many words that it’s a nightmare to relocate scenes. Likewise, it’s far easier on the soul to cut fluffy, useless scenes when you haven’t invested much time in them.
  6. Draft 3: Craft. Word count: 80,000 This is where it starts to get good. You’ve cut the rubbish scenes, sketched out some new ones. I go over each scene, line by line, really crafting my sentences by cutting useless words and selecting the very best ones to use. This is slow going, but it’s where the magic happens.
  7. Draft 4: Give it to someone to read and do something else. Find someone willing to read your manuscript with fresh eyes while you allow your eyes to rest by working on something else entirely. I like to get a few people to read it, if I can. And then I do not revise until I’ve gotten everyone’s feedback. If three out of three people say your first chapter is weak, it is. If one person says your heroine is vapid, one person loves her, and another commented on something else…well, that’s a muddle to sort though and it’s up to you.
  8. Revise. Again.
  9. Revise. Again.
  10. Send it off into the world. After spending years in the writing world, I suspect that this is the step where most authors fail. This is what separates the published from the unpublished. I think there are many excellent books tucked under beds…but you’re not competing with those. You’re competing with the ones composed by brave authors.

Source: Huffington Post Books