Drink tea and get into the flow of writing

1 11 2018

                                                                                                      Photo: Stocksy

Put the kettle on: does a cuppa

beat writer’s block?

Research suggestions that drinking tea might help creativity have received endorsement from a number of successful novelists.

Being British, we have all seized on a report about how drinking tea improves creativity. The researchers – led by Yan Huang, from the Psychological and Cognitive Sciences Department of Peking University – recruited 50 students, who were assigned to two groups and given either tea or water to drink. The students were then given tests, the first being to build an “attractive” design with toy blocks, the second to come up with a “cool and attractive” name for a new ramen noodle restaurant. (“An example of a name that received a low innovativeness score is Ramen Family, and an example of a name that received a high score is No Ramen Here.”)

Those who drank tea performed better in both – and so the humble beverage has been hailed as a means to combat writers’ block by the Telegraph. The researchers don’t go that far – and indeed, the creativity of the participants is called somewhat into question by the detail that the academics had to delete more than 200 suggested restaurant names for containing only the word Ramen, or for including location names. Perhaps it was down to the kind of tea they gave them: it was black, and Lipton (the horror).

Read further @ The Guardian





An Inside View on How to Tackle Writer’s Block

5 09 2018

                                                                                         PHOTO: screencraft,org

BEN MARCUS: WRITER’S BLOCK HAPPENS WHEN I’M BORING

THE AUTHOR OF NOTES FROM THE FOG ON CRAFT, JOY WILLIAMS, AND MORE

How do you tackle writer’s block?
Writer’s block, if that’s the name for it, happens when I am boring, when my mind is flat, when I have nothing to add to what has been said and done. Therefore it happens nearly all of the time. It happens when writing is an obligation and not a desire. And I really don’t mind. It’s not clear that I am meant to pump out writing at all costs. The opposite is true. The world will be just fine without anything I might write. Writing is not exactly a scarce resource. There is far too much out there that hasn’t been read enough. So I don’t try to solve this silence. To me it is necessary.

It is exhausting to be obsessed and driven and full of some pressing need to write—and it doesn’t happen very often. I also don’t write so sharply if I don’t care about what I’m doing, and caring is hard to fake. So, to me, writer’s block is a sign that I probably ultimately don’t give enough of a shit. This is my own flaw. I should care about more than I do. Or what I care about doesn’t fit so obviously inside the boundaries of what I consider fiction. Part of the beginning of any project is the discovery of what matters to me, followed by an attempt to conceive of it in terms of fiction. That’s what it is to start a project: engineering a set of delusions that the act of writing has consequence and simply must be done. When I’ve finished, it’s hard to believe that I ever could have cared so much, but I did, for a little while, and then it’s time to hunt down something new to care about and to hope that I have the ability to make it exist in fiction.

Read further @ Literary Hub





Creative Mind vs Writer’s Block

5 06 2017

Why Your Writer’s Block Doesn’t Have To Be A Silent Killer

As writers, good thoughts tend to come and go; although it seems the best thoughts always come when you don’t have a pen or pencil. It is kind of funny how it works. Then once we get a pen and paper we lose the train of thought we once had before, leaving us wishing we could remember. This is what we call… writer’s block.

I have clearly had a large case of writer’s block and the only thing I can think to write about is writer’s block, but it is actually very hard to do. It is very hard to have a creative mind, one that allows your thought to grow all the time, to develop into something larger than just a thought.

As a writer, you think more about what the readers will think, than the way you write. Because we writers write for more than ourselves. We write for a purpose. A purpose to help someone who is going through the same situations as we have or we are currently going through now, and to create more creative minds around the world. Because we too need a little reading challenge.

Read further @ Huffpost

 





Write When in a Writer’s Burnout

30 05 2012

Best Way To Kickstart Creativity? Just Write

We all hope the words we spin are genius right from the first draft, but let’s be honest: You can revise a draft easier than you can craft perfection from the start. So instead of pining over every sentence, just write, write write.

“When I find I can’t get the gumption to work on an assignment of some sort, it’s because my perfectionist nature is getting in the way and won’t let me actually start, or continue if I’ve already gotten the ball rolling,” says Denene Millner, author of 19 books, including three New York Times bestsellers.

“I’ve read several interviews and articles in the past that had suggested giving yourself permission to write a crappy draft, even going as far as suggesting that you ask your muse to help you write the worst sentence you possibly can,” she advised. “Once you do that, not only do you see that said crap draft or sentence isn’t the end of the world, but then you’ve officially started. So you might as well keep going.”

Still stuck? Check out How to Conquer Writer’s Burnout and Get More Creative.

Source: Galleycat, April 2012