How to Get (Young) People Reading

28 11 2018

                                                                                                  PHOTO: lITHUB.COM

WHAT ONE PERSON CAN DO TO GET PEOPLE READING

THE STORY OF ALVIN IRBY AND BARBERSHOP BOOKS

Alvin Irby never wanted to become a teacher, the same profession his mother held for over 30 years in the Little Rock, Arkansas school district in which he grew up. But the adults in Irby’s life saw potential in him that he couldn’t see in himself. “My high school principal, one day during my senior year, he told me, ‘You’re going to be a better principal than I ever was,’” Irby recalls. “And I remember looking at him and saying, ‘Never! I will never go into education!’”

Yet his principal proved prescient. Irby did go into education, and after teaching for several years, he founded Barbershop Books, a reading incentive program that connects young black boys, ages four to eight, to books in male-centered reading spaces. “Barbershop Books’ primary goal is to increase the out-of-school reading time among black boys and to help young black boys identify as readers,” Irby says. “A lot of reading programs are focused on reading skills. That’s not what Barbershop Books is about. Our program is about connecting fun books to a male-centered space, and involving black men in boys’ early reading experiences.”

The seeds for the idea were planted when Irby was a high school sophomore. “In tenth grade, I was in regular English class,” he says. “We were reading short stories and doing spelling lists. This is what we were doing in tenth grade English. And I remember being bored out of my mind.”

So he went to his guidance counselor and requested a more challenging class. “When I switched into this pre-AP class, one of the first things that I noticed when I looked around, or a question that popped in my head, was, ‘Where did all of these white people come from?’” Irby says. “My regular English class was all black. When I switched into this advanced class, all of a sudden, there were white kids everywhere. I didn’t even know they were in the school! And then I started to wonder, why are these classes divided along racial lines like this? What is that about?”

Read further @ Literary Hub

Advertisements




20 New Papiamento Children’s Books Published

12 01 2018

20 New Papiamento children’s books were developed by the Language Project of the Department of Education in Aruba for use in the primary schools and the exam classes of the secondary schools. Papiamento is a creole language exclusively spoken on the islands of Aruba, Curaçao and Bonaire (Caribbean).

A group of local collaborators, but also internacional persons, wrote, translated, illustrated and edited the material. A varied offer of original works and three translations was the result.

The themes of the books were selected according to the age group. For the primary schools the topics are: friendship, bullying, nature conservation, sports, stamina and teambuilding. Topics selected for the teens are: peer pressure, love, social life, teen pregnancy and drug abuse.

Authors who collaborated are: Desiree Croes, Lorena Boekhoudt-Almary, Beth Briñez Albertsz, Danielle Janga, Marvis Engelhardt, Shaila Vrolijk, Desiree Correa, Yolanda Croes, Diana Marchena-Martes, Ria Arrindell-Broeks, Gina Ramsbottom, Diana Lebacs (Curaçao), Loekie Morales (St. Maarten) and Sally Green (England).

The books are not for sale, but are available at the local library in Aruba.

Read more articles in our new BOOKISH PLAZA eZINE nr. 68 JANUARY 2018 edition.
Just out now!

Visit BookIsh Plaza for our New Arrivals!





Out Now! BookIsh Plaza eZine DECEMBER 2016

7 12 2016

img_5098

The DECEMBER issue of BookIsh Plaza eZine is out now!
BookIsh Plaza is your online bookshop for (Dutch)Caribbean literature.

In this issue:

  • World Premiere Double Play
  • Children’s books for the Season
  • Shrinivási 90 Years!
  • The Giving Season – Give a Book!
  • And much more………

Read & spread the eZine. The next one will appear in January.

BOOKISH PLAZA eZINE nr 57 DECEMBER 2016

Visit BookIsh Plaza for our New Arrivals!





Creating Fictional Worlds

1 02 2014

“How can human-made squiggles on a page reflect lights into our eyes that sends signals to our brains that we logically and emotionally decode as complex narratives?”

The animated video embedded above features a five-minute TED-Ed lesson with tips on how to build fictional worlds in stories. Kate Messner, a children’s books author and a speaker at the TED 2012 conference, served as the educator who crafted this lecture.

Throughout the lesson, Messner makes references to the Lord of the Rings trilogy, the Harry Potter series, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, and other beloved stories. Over at the TED Ed website, writers can access a quiz, a discussion board, and more resources. What are your tips for world building?

Source: GalleyCat