Profiling your writing on the WWW

14 01 2012


How to Make Your Writing More Visible Online

Writers and publishers invest lots of money into creating mobile and digital versions of their books, but the toughest part is finding readers for these new works.

Author and Altimeter Group analyst Rebecca Lieb just published Content Marketing, a book showing how authors can make their writings, books and apps more visible online. She shared her advice in a keynote presentation at the Publishing App Expo. Here are some extra pointers.

Lieb explained: “To achieve search visibility, you have to create content, pure and simple. But this is great news for authors. Why? Because with search (like in the Bible) it all begins with the Word, and authors are natural wordsmiths. Search engines can’t listen to podcasts and they can’t watch videos, but they can (and do) read the written word.”

She continued: “So what authors have to do to achieve online visibility is to create and publish lots of relevant content online. What’s relevant? Stuff that’s related to the subject matter of their book, of course – but not necessarily all about their book. Target terms people may be searching if they’re interested in the subject matter.”

Read full article @ Galleycat





Books and their future

11 01 2012


The many futures of books

There are exciting innovations afoot in both digital and conventional publishing

My prediction about books in the early years of the 21st century: readers, writers, and bibliophiles in general will look back on the cross-fertilisation of the digital world with the global recession, and marvel at the strange fruit that flourished in the paradise of texts.

Consider the following evidence. In Notting Hill, the Redstone Press, an independent devoted to exquisite design and quirky conceptual innovation, published Will Hobson’s The Household Box, a book-in-a-box manufactured in China. Just down the road, Unbound launched the first of its new hardbacks, Terry Jones’s Evil Machines, a sequence of 13 stories about the hidden perils of technology. And finally, Penguin announced it was about to launch a series of short books (novellas, stories, non-fiction) as ebooks for £1.99.

Read full article @ The Guardian





Tips on How to Write Fiction

5 11 2011

 

How to write fiction: Geoff Dyer on freedom

Writing is a natural process – we’re all geared up to do it, says Geoff Dyer
Open thread: how to write fiction

The great thing about this cat – the writing one – is that there are a thousand different ways to skin it. In fact, you don’t have to skin it at all – and it doesn’t even need to be a cat! What I mean, in the first instance, is feel free to dispute or ignore everything in this introduction or in the articles that follow. As Tobias Wolff puts it in his masterly novel Old School: “For a writer there is no such thing as an exemplary life … Certain writers do good work at the bottom of a bottle. The outlaws generally write as well as the bankers, though more briefly. Some writers flourish like opportunistic weeds by hiding among the citizens, others by toughing it out in one sort of desert or another.”

This freedom is the challenging perk of the non-job. If you are a tennis player any weakness – an inability, say, to deal with high-bouncing balls to your backhand – will be just that. And so you must devote long hours of practice to making the vulnerable parts of your game less vulnerable. If you are a writer the equivalent weakness can rarely be made good so you are probably better off letting it atrophy and enhancing some other aspect of your performance.

Writers are defined, in large measure, by what they can’t do. The mass of things that lie beyond their abilities force them to concentrate on the things they can. “I can’t do this,” exclaims the distraught Mother-Writer in People Like That Are the Only People Here, Lorrie Moore’s famous story about a young child dying of cancer. “I can do quasi-amusing phone dialogue. I do the careful ironies of daydreams. I do the marshy ideas upon which intimate life is built …” From the sum total of these apparent trivialities emerges a fiction which succeeds in doing precisely what it claims it can’t.

Read full article @ The Guardian