6 02 2018

How the internet changed the way we write – and what to do about it

The usual evolution of English has been accelerated online, leading to a less formal – but arguably more expressive – language than the one we use IRL. So use those emojis wisely …

English has always evolved – that’s what it means to be a living language – and now the internet plays a pivotal role in driving this evolution. It’s where we talk most freely and naturally, and where we generally pay little heed to whether or not our grammar is “correct”.

Should we be concerned that, as a consequence, English is deteriorating? Is it changing at such a fast pace that older generations can’t keep up? Not quite. At a talk in 2013, linguist David Crystal, author of Internet Linguistics, said: “The vast majority of English is exactly the same today as it was 20 years ago.” And his collected data indicated that even e-communication isn’t wildly different: “Ninety per cent or so of the language you use in a text is standard English, or at least your local dialect.”

It’s why we can still read an 18th-century transcript of a speech George Washington gave to his troops and understand it in its entirety, and why grandparents don’t need a translator when sending an email to their grandchildren.

Read further @ The Guardian

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HOW TO WRITE A CHILDREN’S BOOK

29 11 2017

If books are magic, then children’s books are an extra special brand of magic. The books we read as kids don’t just stick with us, they form who we are and what we believe and how we see the world. Writing a children’s book is a calling, but learning how to write a children’s book is also a very long process with nitty-gritty, non-magical details—and it’s full of variables. No two journeys are exactly the same, but if you’re an aspiring children’s book writer, here is a rough outline of how to go from idea to book!

STEP 1. READ A LOT

STEP 2. CRACK OPEN THAT NOTEBOOK AND GET TO WORK

STEP 3. BE PERSISTENT

STEP 4. CELEBRATE! THEN REVISE

STEP 5. BRING IN OTHER EYES

STEP 6. DO YOUR RESEARCH!

STEP 7. CRAFT A KILLER QUERY

STEP 8. CULTIVATE PATIENCE

STEP 9. CULTIVATE SOME MORE PATIENCE, BUT ALSO KEEP WRITING

STEP 10. WORK WITH EDITOR! AND MORE PATIENCE!

STEP 11. YOU HAVE A BOOK!

Read further @ BookRiot





Creative Mind vs Writer’s Block

5 06 2017

Why Your Writer’s Block Doesn’t Have To Be A Silent Killer

As writers, good thoughts tend to come and go; although it seems the best thoughts always come when you don’t have a pen or pencil. It is kind of funny how it works. Then once we get a pen and paper we lose the train of thought we once had before, leaving us wishing we could remember. This is what we call… writer’s block.

I have clearly had a large case of writer’s block and the only thing I can think to write about is writer’s block, but it is actually very hard to do. It is very hard to have a creative mind, one that allows your thought to grow all the time, to develop into something larger than just a thought.

As a writer, you think more about what the readers will think, than the way you write. Because we writers write for more than ourselves. We write for a purpose. A purpose to help someone who is going through the same situations as we have or we are currently going through now, and to create more creative minds around the world. Because we too need a little reading challenge.

Read further @ Huffpost

 





Wanna Be a Writer?

5 06 2017

HOW TO BE A WRITER: 10 TIPS

  1. Write
  2. Remember writing is not typing
  3. Read. And don’t read
  4. Listen. Don’t listen
  5. Find a vocation
  6. Time
  7. Facts
  8. Joy
  9. What we call success is very nice and comes with useful byproducts, but succes is not love
  10. It’s all really up to you

Read further @ Literary Hub





On the Importance of Kindness and Reading Widely

28 04 2017

COLUM MCCANN’S
ADVICE TO YOUNG WRITERS

I. Don’t Be a Dick

Three things in human life are important: the first is to be kind; the second is to be kind; and the third is to be kind.

–Henry James

II. Read, Read, Read

Trying to write without reading is like venturing out to sea all by yourself in a small boat: lonely and dangerous. Wouldn’t you rather see the horizon filled, end to end, with other sails? Wouldn’t you rather wave to neighboring vessels; admire their craftsmanship; cut in and out of the wakes that suit you, knowing that you’ll leave a wake of your own, and that there’s enough wind and sea for you all?

–Téa Obreht

Read further @ Literary Hub

 





Wanna be a Novelist?

11 03 2017

NELL ZINK: HOW TO BECOME
A NOVELIST IN TEN EASY STEPS

1. Examine your motives
2. Arrange financing
3. Write a bad novella
4. Don’t publish the bad novella
5. Think of a plot and characters
6. Write your debut
7. Never worry about style
8. Get an agent
9. Sell it
10. Write another one

Read further @ Literary Hub





Write a Book Proposal

28 02 2016

typewriter

New authors looking to get into the publishing business deal will need to have a book proposal to get a publisher or agent to even look at their work.

Publishing consultant Jane Friedman outlined some great tips for writing a book proposal. These steps are great insights to help you get started in writing a book proposal. Here!