Reading Challenges

1 03 2018

50 DIY READING CHALLENGES TO MAKE 2018 THE BEST YEAR OF YOUR READING LIFE

The challenges here range from the serious to the ridiculous. The numbers are mostly arbitrary—for instance, I’ve used a lot of pick ten books. You could just as easily pick five or thirty. These ideas are jumping off points. My hope is that you find something here that excites you, and run with it.

1. Make a list of ten identities that are important to you and/or influence the way you experience the world. Now read ten books by ten different authors who share one of those identities, and/or ten different books that center and explore those identities.

2. Make a list of ten identities (race, religion, sexuality, gender, nationality, etc.) that are not yours. Now read ten books, each written by an author who holds one of those identities.

3. Pick ten countries you have always wanted to visit. Read one book that takes place in each of those countries.

4. Is there a genre you’ve always wanted to try but just haven’t gotten around to? Maybe your best friend has been telling you to try fantasy since forever but you’ve always shrugged her off. Pick the genre that’s always scared/baffled/bored you and challenge yourself to find one book in that genre that you absolutely love.

5. Read a book published each year between your birth and now. Goodreads by decade shelves can help.

6. Read a book about/that takes place in each of the fifty states.

7. Pick 10 classics you’ve always wanted to read. Now read a retelling/reinvention of each of those classics instead. Not sure where to start? Try these YA Jane Austen retellings, Alice in Wonderlandretellings, and retellings of myths and folklore.

8. Read 52 comics—one comic per week!

Read further @ BookRiot





New Edition on Hispanic Caribbean Literature of Migration

4 09 2012

Vanessa Pérez Rosario’s Hispanic Caribbean Literature of Migration: Narratives of Displacement (2010) was reissued in paperback edition this August by Palgrave Macmillan.

Hispanic Caribbean Literature of Migration: Narratives of Displacement is a collection of thirteen chapters that explores the literary tradition of Caribbean Latino literature written in the U.S. beginning with José Martí and concluding with 2008 Pulitzer Prize winning novelist, Junot Díaz. The essays in this collection reveal the multiple ways that writers of this tradition use their unique positioning as both insiders and outsiders to critique U.S. hegemonic discourses while simultaneously interrogating national discourses in their home countries. The chapters consider the way that spatial migration in literature serves as a metaphor for gender, sexuality, racial, identity, linguistic and national migrations.

Doris Sommer (Harvard University) writes: “Hispanic Caribbean Literature of Migration: Narratives of Displacement is an impressive accomplishment. The essays explore key moments in the history of Caribbean Latino literature and bring expert critical attention to trends over the past 150 years. Latino, meaning of Spanish speaking heritage in Anglo-America, is a word that points to contrapuntal doubling from the richly informative Introduction by Vanessa Pérez Rosario and throughout the dozen excellent essays. The collection foregrounds the work of both established and younger scholars in the field, all of whom tackle a major author and deepen our appreciation through rich contextualization and fine readings. No other book I know on Latino literature is as timely, broad, and welcome.”

VANESSA PEREZ ROSARIO is an assistant professor of Puerto Rican and Latino Studies at The City University of New York – Brooklyn College.

Source: Repeating Islands, August 2012