Writing a Blockbuster Book

1 03 2017

theThe Bestseller Experiment: can you deliberately write a blockbuster book?

Mark Stay and Mark Desvaux are picking up clues from publishers and authors in a new podcast, while they go about trying to write the next bestseller

Everyone may have a book in them, but what about a bestselling one? It would seem obvious that the big-name authors are going to go straight to the top of the charts, but periodically a book comes out of nowhere that captures the imagination — and the public’s money — to become a break-out hit.

But is there actually a formula for writing a bestseller? Mark Stay and Mark Desvaux think think there might be, and they’ve given themselves one year to make it happen.

Stay has some form in publishing: he works for Orion and has writing chops, having written the screenplay and resulting novel for the movie Robot Overlords, which was released last year.

Read further @ The Guardian





Beware New Authors for Pitfalls

26 07 2014

No-Mistakes-

The 10 Biggest Mistakes New Authors Make

I have to preface this post by noting how easy it is to make mistakes when you’re on the road to becoming a published author. This is an emotional journey, and ego can sometimes get in the way. Then there’s the many details you must hold, which even publishers get wrong from time to time. I’ve experienced firsthand the pain of a few or more projects that went to print with pretty egregious problems. And it hurts. Sometimes entire print runs are destroyed as a result. These top 10 mistakes are among the most common I see in my work with authors. Some are about mindset and others are more technical oversights. If you’ve made any of these mistakes, you’re in good company. The best we can do is learn, and spread the word so others take heed.

1. Believing what they want to hear.
2. Not taking advantage of every available digital platform.
3. Deciding that they don’t need a marketing campaign, or starting one too late.
4. Believing that more is better.
5. Going renegade.
6. Not doing enough research on who they’re publishing with.
7. Believing that “traditional” is better, no matter what.
8. Failing to get sample product.
9. Not hiring professionals.
10. Choosing a print run over print-on-demand (POD).

Read further for more details @ Huffington Post

 





Marías’ Only Reason to Write a Novel

26 07 2014

descargaSeven Reasons Not to Write Novels and Only One Reason to Write Them

by Javier Marías

I can think of seven reasons not to write novels:

First: There are too many novels and too many people writing them. Not only do those already written continue to exist and demand to be eternally read, but thousands more entirely new novels keep appearing in publishers’ catalogs and in bookshops around the world; then there are the many thousands rejected by publishers that never reach the bookshops, but which nonetheless exist. It is, then, a commonplace activity, one that is, in theory, within the grasp of anyone who learned to write at school, and for which no higher education or special training is required.

Read further for the other reasons @ Three Penny Review

Javier Marías, Spain’s foremost contemporary novelist, has had his work translated into more than forty languages; his most recent novel is The Infatuations.

 





Searching for the Right Book Cover

14 01 2012

Suzanne Dean: the secret to a good book cover

Suzanne Dean designed the cover for the Man Booker prize winner ‘The Sense of an Ending’ by Julian Barnes. She talks about creating some of the most striking book jackets of the past 20 years.

To judge a book by its cover is so patently unwise that it has long been a metaphor for other forms of misinterpretation. But only a very naive author would suppose that the cover of his or her book was irrelevant. It’s the first thing we see, and there’s no way to make it entirely objective: a book’s cover offers an interpretation of its contents – some inflection, if only by its typeface or colour. And yet its effect on the reader is mostly subliminal. Book designers are the ultimate hidden persuaders.

Earlier last year, in his acceptance speech for the Man Booker Prize, Julian Barnes effectively outed one of the women behind his throne: Suzanne Dean, the creative director of Random House, who has been designing the jackets of his books for years. And it seems about time that designers stepped forward and took more credit: with the rise of e-books, physical books have become even more covetable as objects. If you just want to read something, you can do that electronically; if you want to own it, the book should be as beautiful as possible.

Dean, who started designing for Penguin almost 20 years ago, then moved from there to Picador and Random House, now oversees all of Cornerstone and Vintage publishing; this week, she was the only designer included in The Bookseller’s list of “100 most influential people in the book trade”. Over the years, she has come up with a vast number of diverse and memorable covers: the silver first edition of Donna Tartt’s The Secret History, the hardback of Don DeLillo’s Underworld, Ian McEwan’s Atonement and Mark Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, to name a few. Yet she has only started to put her name on them in the last four years or so.

She feels very strongly that e-books offer designers of physical books the opportunity to be more creative. “I absolutely think we should seize the initiative and make the best books we can,” she told me in her office earlier this week. “I can’t imagine a world that didn’t have books on shelves – it would be like having no paintings on walls or photographs in frames. All of these things are part of what makes you who you are.”

 Read full article @ The Telegraph