INFOGRAPHIC: Who Influenced Who?

29 10 2016

influential-authors-galleycat

Source: GalleyCat

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Writers’ Confessions with Junot Diaz

3 06 2016

Junot-Diaz-Copyright-Nina-Subin

 





New Edition on Hispanic Caribbean Literature of Migration

4 09 2012

Vanessa Pérez Rosario’s Hispanic Caribbean Literature of Migration: Narratives of Displacement (2010) was reissued in paperback edition this August by Palgrave Macmillan.

Hispanic Caribbean Literature of Migration: Narratives of Displacement is a collection of thirteen chapters that explores the literary tradition of Caribbean Latino literature written in the U.S. beginning with José Martí and concluding with 2008 Pulitzer Prize winning novelist, Junot Díaz. The essays in this collection reveal the multiple ways that writers of this tradition use their unique positioning as both insiders and outsiders to critique U.S. hegemonic discourses while simultaneously interrogating national discourses in their home countries. The chapters consider the way that spatial migration in literature serves as a metaphor for gender, sexuality, racial, identity, linguistic and national migrations.

Doris Sommer (Harvard University) writes: “Hispanic Caribbean Literature of Migration: Narratives of Displacement is an impressive accomplishment. The essays explore key moments in the history of Caribbean Latino literature and bring expert critical attention to trends over the past 150 years. Latino, meaning of Spanish speaking heritage in Anglo-America, is a word that points to contrapuntal doubling from the richly informative Introduction by Vanessa Pérez Rosario and throughout the dozen excellent essays. The collection foregrounds the work of both established and younger scholars in the field, all of whom tackle a major author and deepen our appreciation through rich contextualization and fine readings. No other book I know on Latino literature is as timely, broad, and welcome.”

VANESSA PEREZ ROSARIO is an assistant professor of Puerto Rican and Latino Studies at The City University of New York – Brooklyn College.

Source: Repeating Islands, August 2012

 





New Book on Migration and Displacement in Dominican Literature

17 02 2012

Danny Méndez’s Narratives of Migration and Displacement in Dominican Literature was published this month (February 2012) by Routledge.

Establishing an interdisciplinary connection between Migration Studies, Post-Colonial Studies and Affect Theory, Méndez analyzes the symbolic interplay between emotions, cognitions, and displacement in the narratives written by and about Dominican and Dominican-Americans in the United States and Puerto Rico. He argues that given the historic place of creolization as a marker of national, cultural, and social development in the Caribbean and particularly the Dominican Republic, this cultural process is not magically annulled in Caribbean immigrations to the U.S. Instead, this book illustrates the numerous ways in which Dominicans’ subjective interpretation of their experiences of migration and incorporation into U.S. society, seen through the filter of multiple creolizations of the past, are woven into their written works as a series of variations on Americanness and Dominicanness.

Through close readings of selected writings by Pedro Henríquez Ureña, José Luis González, Junot Díaz, Josefina Báez, Loida Maritza Pérez among others, Méndez argues that emotional creolizations operate as a psychological parameter on immigrant populations as they negotiate their transcultural status against the ideological norms of assimilation in their new host country. Consequently, he proposes that this emotional creolization is dialectical — that is, it not only affects diasporic populations, but also changes the norms and terms of assimilation as well.

Continue reading @ Repeating Islands