Reading Challenges

1 03 2018

50 DIY READING CHALLENGES TO MAKE 2018 THE BEST YEAR OF YOUR READING LIFE

The challenges here range from the serious to the ridiculous. The numbers are mostly arbitrary—for instance, I’ve used a lot of pick ten books. You could just as easily pick five or thirty. These ideas are jumping off points. My hope is that you find something here that excites you, and run with it.

1. Make a list of ten identities that are important to you and/or influence the way you experience the world. Now read ten books by ten different authors who share one of those identities, and/or ten different books that center and explore those identities.

2. Make a list of ten identities (race, religion, sexuality, gender, nationality, etc.) that are not yours. Now read ten books, each written by an author who holds one of those identities.

3. Pick ten countries you have always wanted to visit. Read one book that takes place in each of those countries.

4. Is there a genre you’ve always wanted to try but just haven’t gotten around to? Maybe your best friend has been telling you to try fantasy since forever but you’ve always shrugged her off. Pick the genre that’s always scared/baffled/bored you and challenge yourself to find one book in that genre that you absolutely love.

5. Read a book published each year between your birth and now. Goodreads by decade shelves can help.

6. Read a book about/that takes place in each of the fifty states.

7. Pick 10 classics you’ve always wanted to read. Now read a retelling/reinvention of each of those classics instead. Not sure where to start? Try these YA Jane Austen retellings, Alice in Wonderlandretellings, and retellings of myths and folklore.

8. Read 52 comics—one comic per week!

Read further @ BookRiot

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Tips to Building Suspense

1 09 2017

WHAT JANE AUSTEN CAN TEACH US
ABOUT BUILDING SUSPENSE

HOW TO USE DRAMATIC IRONY AND PLOT SECRETS

Secrets are key to Jane Austen’s fiction and to driving her narratives forward. She lived in a society where life was lived very publicly, and yet true feelings and emotions were often kept hidden. In Love and Friendship she spoofed the cult of sensibility—the characters have constant fits of fainting, weeping and running mad—but in her mature works Jane Austen demonstrated the power of keeping characters’ feelings under wraps. Mr. Darcy’s first proposal to Elizabeth is a wonderful example of suppressed feelings coming to the surface. In Chapter 34 of Pride and Prejudice he bursts out, “In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you,” sentences that can now be bought on tote bags and keyrings. Until this point Mr. Darcy has kept his feelings hidden because he thinks that Elizabeth’s family are beneath him.

Read further @ Literary Hub





The First 10 out of 100 Must-read Second Novels

29 10 2016

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The first ten of the 100 must-read second novels. Not the debut, but the follow-ups. And I must say some of these I’ve read are amazing. Pride & Prejudice I’ve read in my teens and I find it still enticing. And In Time of the Butterflies, brings me to the reality of our region of the Caribbean. Which is your favorite one?

  1. No Longer at Ease by Chinua Achebe
  2. At Night We Walk in Circles by Daniel Alarcón
  3. The Hummingbird’s Daughter by Luis Alberto Urrea
  4. In the Time of the Butterflies by Julia Álvarez
  5. Surfacing by Margaret Atwood
  6. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  7. Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin
  8. Sister of My Heart by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni
  9. City of Thieves by David Benioff
  10. The Teleportation Accident by Ned Beauman

Read further for the rest @ BookRiot