Painting Away Regrets with Opal Palmer Adisa

11 01 2012

Jamaican born Opal Palmer Adisa’s new novel, Painting Away Regrets was recently published by Peepal Tree Press (2011).

Christine and Donald are two modern, urban professionals, fundamentally unsuited to one another, caught in the currents of life, and bound by the one thing they have in common–powerful sexual desires. They meet in graduate school at Berkeley and become consumed by the amazing sexual chemistry they share. Marriage and four children later, Christine and Donald are at a crossroads. Moving easily between the Caribbean, Africa and the USA, the novel dances between the real-life drama that unfolds between Christine and Donald, and the spiritual world of the Orishas where every human act has a spiritual ramification.

Gail Tsukiyama (author of The Samurai’s Garden and The Street of a Thousand Blossoms) writes: “Rich in the vibrant rhythms and colors of the Caribbean, Painting Away Regrets, is a song that resonates the redeeming power of love and family. Opal Palmer Adisa’s storytelling shines in the lush island folklore; in this story of one woman’s spiritual and sensual journey towards healing and forgiveness.”

[The book cover features LeRoy Clarke’s painting “Arima Mama.”]

Opal Palmer Adisa holds a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. She is a Jamaica-born, award-winning poet, and professor of creative writing and literature at the California College of the Arts, and her work has appeared in more than 200 journals, anthologies, and other publications. She is also the author of numerous poetry and short story collections. Her first novel was It Begins with Tears.

Source: Repeating Islands, dec 2011

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New Collection of Short Stories on Jamaican Society

10 01 2012

Parable of the Mangoes, a new collection of short stories by Jamaica’s Jean Goulbourne

As poet and novelist, Jean L. Goulbourne writes about the distress, anger, struggle and creativity which she witnesses in Jamaican society from the perspective of a historian and educator (she is a lecturer in History and Social Studies at Church Teachers’ College in Mandeville, Jamaica). Her writing is poetic, economical, pungent and stimulating, and she has received several writing awards. Goulbourne recently published a collection of short stories called Parable of the Mangoes (Abeng Press, 2011). Here are two book reviews, the first by Jean Small and the second by Amazon.com. We thank Peter Jordens for the information in this post.

The Jamaica Cultural Development Commission’s 2010 gold medalist for short-story writing, Jean Goulbourne, has wasted no time in producing her newest collection of stories, Parable of the Mangoes, published by Abeng Press.

Born in Black River on Jamaica’s south coast, Jean developed a keen eye and ear for all that happened around her in rural Jamaica. These 12 stories express a love of the land, a commitment to the development of the nation, and a sympathetic and compassionate understanding of the lives of a people whose ancestors experienced the harsh circumstances of colonization and slavery.

Read full article @ Repeating Islands





First Novel for Jamaican Writer Olive Senior

8 12 2011

Prize-winning Jamaican writer, Olive Senior, will launch her first novel, Dancing Lessons, on Sunday, December 11 at the University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona campus. The launch will be held at the Neville Hall Lecture Theatre and will begin at 11 a.m., Jamaica’s Gleaner reports.

Dancing Lessons is sad, satirical, hilarious, and ultimately redemptive. A novel infused with the cadences and colour of Jamaica yet connecting with anyone anywhere who engages with notions of family, love, loss, friendship and belonging.

This new novel is further acknowledgement of Senior’s prodigious talent.

Since publishing her first poetry collection, Talking of Trees in 1985, Senior has published three other well-received poetry collections. Gardening in the Tropics won the F.J. Bressani Literary Prize, while Over the Roofs of the World (2005) was shortlisted for Canada’s Governor General’s Literary Award and Cuba’s Casa de las Americas Prize, and Shell (2007) was shortlisted for the Pat Lowther Award.

Read full article @ Repeating Islands