Out now! BookIsh Plaza eZine JUNE issue

30 05 2018

Jamaican poet Safiya Sinclair @ 2018 Poetry International, Rotterdam

The JUNE issue of BookIsh Plaza eZine is out now!
BookIsh Plaza is your online bookshop for (Dutch)Caribbean literature.

In this issue:

  • Summer Creative Writing in Curaçao
  • St. Martin Book Fair in June
  • In the Picture: St. Martin Books
  • And much more ……….

Read & share the eZine. The next issue will appear in June.

BOOKISH PLAZA eZINE nr.73 JUNE 2018

Visit BookIsh Plaza for our New Arrivals!

 





Subconscious Mind & Creative Writing

3 06 2015

brain

How the subconscious mind shapes creative writing

Do you remember those plastic slide puzzles you used to get in party bags? They were made up of a three by three grid with eight tiles and a blank square – the missing tile allowing you to move the others around.

This nine-grid puzzle was the central image behind the story of Mark Haddon’sThe Red House – although, bizarrely, he didn’t know it when he wrote the book.

“I was being interviewed by Claire Armitstead at the Edinburgh Books Festival when she said that when she read the book she kept thinking about those tile puzzles,” wrote Haddon on his blog after the interview.

“I felt a lurch, because before writing The Red House I’d given up on a novel called The Missing Square, the central image of which was one of those tile puzzles, and whose organising conceit was that certain absences may make a world imperfect, but they enable that world to change and generate new meanings. I suddenly realised this image had remained a model for the central structure of The Red House, which is a story about the eight remaining members of a family and a ninth member – a stillborn daughter – who is still having a profound effect on the family despite, or because of, her absence.”

This hidden structure enabled Haddon to plot and plan his novel around a central theme without even realising it. Unusual, but perhaps not unheard of, this got me thinking: how many other novelists have plotted their books subconsciously?

Read further @ The Guardian