Books and their future

11 01 2012


The many futures of books

There are exciting innovations afoot in both digital and conventional publishing

My prediction about books in the early years of the 21st century: readers, writers, and bibliophiles in general will look back on the cross-fertilisation of the digital world with the global recession, and marvel at the strange fruit that flourished in the paradise of texts.

Consider the following evidence. In Notting Hill, the Redstone Press, an independent devoted to exquisite design and quirky conceptual innovation, published Will Hobson’s The Household Box, a book-in-a-box manufactured in China. Just down the road, Unbound launched the first of its new hardbacks, Terry Jones’s Evil Machines, a sequence of 13 stories about the hidden perils of technology. And finally, Penguin announced it was about to launch a series of short books (novellas, stories, non-fiction) as ebooks for £1.99.

Read full article @ The Guardian





To get into Symbolism, or not

11 01 2012

 

Serious questions about the standard of modern literary discussion

Would contemporary authors relish the daunting seriousness of a schoolboy questionnaire, sent to 150 leading authors in 1963? Among others Jack Kerouac, Ayn Rand and Norman Mailer.

Many a contemporary author, weary of the trivialising attentions of the modern media, dreams fondly of an age of higher seriousness and plainer clothes. But this little gem from the Paris Review archives might possibly make them think again.

1. Do you consciously plan and place symbolism in your writing? If both yes and no, please be specific. If yes, please state your method of doing so.

Do you feel you subconsciously place symbolism in your writing?

That is the opening question from 16-year-old Bruce McAllister’s schoolboy survey, sent out to 150 leading authors in 1963.

Read full article @ The Guardian





Painting Away Regrets with Opal Palmer Adisa

11 01 2012

Jamaican born Opal Palmer Adisa’s new novel, Painting Away Regrets was recently published by Peepal Tree Press (2011).

Christine and Donald are two modern, urban professionals, fundamentally unsuited to one another, caught in the currents of life, and bound by the one thing they have in common–powerful sexual desires. They meet in graduate school at Berkeley and become consumed by the amazing sexual chemistry they share. Marriage and four children later, Christine and Donald are at a crossroads. Moving easily between the Caribbean, Africa and the USA, the novel dances between the real-life drama that unfolds between Christine and Donald, and the spiritual world of the Orishas where every human act has a spiritual ramification.

Gail Tsukiyama (author of The Samurai’s Garden and The Street of a Thousand Blossoms) writes: “Rich in the vibrant rhythms and colors of the Caribbean, Painting Away Regrets, is a song that resonates the redeeming power of love and family. Opal Palmer Adisa’s storytelling shines in the lush island folklore; in this story of one woman’s spiritual and sensual journey towards healing and forgiveness.”

[The book cover features LeRoy Clarke’s painting “Arima Mama.”]

Opal Palmer Adisa holds a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. She is a Jamaica-born, award-winning poet, and professor of creative writing and literature at the California College of the Arts, and her work has appeared in more than 200 journals, anthologies, and other publications. She is also the author of numerous poetry and short story collections. Her first novel was It Begins with Tears.

Source: Repeating Islands, dec 2011





2012 Havana International Book Fair

10 01 2012

Each February, Havana’s International Book Fair transforms the old Spanish fortification San Carlos de La Cabana that overlooks the Havana harbour into one of the biggest book parties in the world. It takes place in Havana for 10 days before continuing on to the other cities for two more weeks. The book fair ends in the eastern city of Santiago de Cuba.

The festival consists of book vendors, poetry readings, children’s activities, art exhibitions, and concerts in the evenings. It is considered Cuba’s premier cultural event, as well as the event with the highest attendance in Cuba: the XX International Book Fair drew over 2.3 million people to the Capital City!

Along with the public, the book fair is attended by Cuban and international authors, publishers, and political officials. Over 100 publishing houses present catalogues of books, including Casa de las Américas. Each book fair is dedicated to a genre, issue, or author, and also a guest of honour. Since 2000, each book fair has been dedicated to Cuban authors and intellectuals.

The 21st International Book Fair of Havana will begin in Havana City on February 9, 2012 (for ten days), and then it will spread east and west of the capital to all provinces of the country. The book fair will end in the eastern city of Santiago de Cuba on March 5.

Under the theme “To Read is To Grow”, the 2012 Book Fair will be dedicated to the cultures of the Caribbean countries, Minister of Culture Abel Prieto announced during the closing of the XX International Book Fair of Havana in the eastern city of Santiago de Cuba. The event will praise the cultural heritage, the traditions and the interrelations of the Caribbean nations.

Read full article @ Autentic Cuba Travel





New Collection of Short Stories on Jamaican Society

10 01 2012

Parable of the Mangoes, a new collection of short stories by Jamaica’s Jean Goulbourne

As poet and novelist, Jean L. Goulbourne writes about the distress, anger, struggle and creativity which she witnesses in Jamaican society from the perspective of a historian and educator (she is a lecturer in History and Social Studies at Church Teachers’ College in Mandeville, Jamaica). Her writing is poetic, economical, pungent and stimulating, and she has received several writing awards. Goulbourne recently published a collection of short stories called Parable of the Mangoes (Abeng Press, 2011). Here are two book reviews, the first by Jean Small and the second by Amazon.com. We thank Peter Jordens for the information in this post.

The Jamaica Cultural Development Commission’s 2010 gold medalist for short-story writing, Jean Goulbourne, has wasted no time in producing her newest collection of stories, Parable of the Mangoes, published by Abeng Press.

Born in Black River on Jamaica’s south coast, Jean developed a keen eye and ear for all that happened around her in rural Jamaica. These 12 stories express a love of the land, a commitment to the development of the nation, and a sympathetic and compassionate understanding of the lives of a people whose ancestors experienced the harsh circumstances of colonization and slavery.

Read full article @ Repeating Islands





Photo Impression BookIsh Plaza @ Festival di Dande

8 01 2012

BookIsh Plaza dec 2011 037

By eneryvibes

The Meet & Greet at the Festival di Dande in Rotterdam was a success. BookIsh Plaza was present spreading the reading vibe and people were interested in our broad assortment of books. It was a great evening with nice performances and an awesome gaita group of singers.

The festival by the way is a cultural festivity we Arubians celebrate coming the New Year. The tradition goes that the days before New Year, groups of musicians will go from house to house in the neigbourhood to give all fine wishes to their fellow men by singing: ‘Oh Dande nos a yega na bo porta, Ay Nobe’ [We come to bring you good tidings in the New Year, Happy New Year]. They will sing for all the members of the houshold. They’ll pass a hat around so you can give them a tip, they eat and drink, then go on their way. This will go on the whole day till late at night. I still remember as a child they came to my grandmother’s house. That’s the first time I ever had the pleasure to meet an authentic Dande group.
In Aruba this custom has grown with the years and you’ll find Dande groups everywhere wishing you very best wishes. Check out my post on the eneryvibes blog of one of them HERE.
Abroad naturally we don’t hit the road so these festivals are organised in a venue and the best singer is selected.

book fans

the banner right in the goal

one of the Dande singers

chatting with booklovers

our Aruban authors collection

 

the Gaita group bringing the season ambiance

Searching for the right book & finding it

finally the winner, Rey di Dande 2011, courtesy of Photo Indio