2012 Havana International Book Fair

10 01 2012

Each February, Havana’s International Book Fair transforms the old Spanish fortification San Carlos de La Cabana that overlooks the Havana harbour into one of the biggest book parties in the world. It takes place in Havana for 10 days before continuing on to the other cities for two more weeks. The book fair ends in the eastern city of Santiago de Cuba.

The festival consists of book vendors, poetry readings, children’s activities, art exhibitions, and concerts in the evenings. It is considered Cuba’s premier cultural event, as well as the event with the highest attendance in Cuba: the XX International Book Fair drew over 2.3 million people to the Capital City!

Along with the public, the book fair is attended by Cuban and international authors, publishers, and political officials. Over 100 publishing houses present catalogues of books, including Casa de las Américas. Each book fair is dedicated to a genre, issue, or author, and also a guest of honour. Since 2000, each book fair has been dedicated to Cuban authors and intellectuals.

The 21st International Book Fair of Havana will begin in Havana City on February 9, 2012 (for ten days), and then it will spread east and west of the capital to all provinces of the country. The book fair will end in the eastern city of Santiago de Cuba on March 5.

Under the theme “To Read is To Grow”, the 2012 Book Fair will be dedicated to the cultures of the Caribbean countries, Minister of Culture Abel Prieto announced during the closing of the XX International Book Fair of Havana in the eastern city of Santiago de Cuba. The event will praise the cultural heritage, the traditions and the interrelations of the Caribbean nations.

Read full article @ Autentic Cuba Travel





New Collection of Short Stories on Jamaican Society

10 01 2012

Parable of the Mangoes, a new collection of short stories by Jamaica’s Jean Goulbourne

As poet and novelist, Jean L. Goulbourne writes about the distress, anger, struggle and creativity which she witnesses in Jamaican society from the perspective of a historian and educator (she is a lecturer in History and Social Studies at Church Teachers’ College in Mandeville, Jamaica). Her writing is poetic, economical, pungent and stimulating, and she has received several writing awards. Goulbourne recently published a collection of short stories called Parable of the Mangoes (Abeng Press, 2011). Here are two book reviews, the first by Jean Small and the second by Amazon.com. We thank Peter Jordens for the information in this post.

The Jamaica Cultural Development Commission’s 2010 gold medalist for short-story writing, Jean Goulbourne, has wasted no time in producing her newest collection of stories, Parable of the Mangoes, published by Abeng Press.

Born in Black River on Jamaica’s south coast, Jean developed a keen eye and ear for all that happened around her in rural Jamaica. These 12 stories express a love of the land, a commitment to the development of the nation, and a sympathetic and compassionate understanding of the lives of a people whose ancestors experienced the harsh circumstances of colonization and slavery.

Read full article @ Repeating Islands