Booklaunch “Meerstemmig Verleden” on Dutch Slavery Past

5 11 2011

On tuesday November 15th the book Meerstemmig Verleden will be presented at 8.00 p.m. at De Nieuwe Liefde, Da Costakade 2, Amsterdam. There will be a debate on different representations of the Dutch slavery past (in response to the tv series De Slavernij), stories, music and cabaret.

The book is published by KIT Publishers and gives personal accounts of how people view slavery. It is the result of the project of the Foundation Colorful Past about Dutch slavery past.

Aruban poet/writer Quito Nicolaas is one of the persons interviewed. He emphasizes the responsibility of the Creole-Surinamese community in gathering personal stories of the slavery experience. Helga Fredison put the emancipation struggle of her famous great-uncle Anton de Kom and Eddy Caffé is still deeply connected to the Church where his great-grandfather worked as a slave. By accommodating these personal stories creates a nuanced picture of the legacy of the Dutch slavery past. A nuance that is lacking in debates. 

TICKETS are obtained @ De Nieuwe Liefde

“Meerstemmig Verleden” soon available @ BookIsh Plaza





“Kwelgeesten rond de kapokboom” Recently Launched

5 11 2011

Last Friday november 4th saw the booklaunch of Kwelgeesten rond de kapokboom by author Charlotte Doornhein and visual artist Frouwkje Smit who sketches with the crossover novel and the art video, exceptional stories that take place around a nature reserve in Curaçao where in ancient times Indians lived.

Doornheim is also the organisor of the Festival Literaire Tippel Zone on Curaçao. A festival that attracts thousands of visitors each year-young and old. The name Charlotte Doornhein guarantees mystery and innovation in art & literature.

Read full article (in Dutch) @ Caribe Magazine





New book by Puerto Rican Author to be Launched

5 11 2011

Booklaunch of LuzAzul, new novel by Antonio Aguado Charneco

The presentation will be made on Thursday, 10 November 2011, at the Center for Puerto Rico, at 7: 00 pm. LuzAzul, published under the label of Isla Negra Editores, involves in its plot vivid and ambiguous love, during the University strike of the year 2010.Antonio Aguado Charneco, a writer awarded by both national and international cultural institutions some of which are: UNESCO, the Puerto Rican Ateneo, the Institute for literature, Los Juegos Florales de San Germán and the circle of writers and poets Iberoamericanos.
 
Among others, Antonio Aguado Charneco has published the books Anacahuita: Florespinas (2006), Ouroboros: seis cuentos (1985), Bajarí Baracutey: El taíno de la cueva (1993), and Sendero umbrío (1997).
 
Read full article (in Spanish) @ Boreales
 




Booklaunch latest book by Dominican Writer

5 11 2011

New Book: Carmen Imbert-Brugal’s “Memorias de la Señora”

Dominican writer Carmen Imbert-Brugal will present her most recent book of short stories Memorias de la Señora (Editorial Santuario, 2011) at the XIV International Book Fair of Puerto Rico, which takes place from November 9-13, 2011. The presentation will take place on November 9, at 7:00pm, at the Poets Café at the Peace Pavilion (Luís Muñoz Rivera Park).

[Also see Puerto Rico’s XIV International Book Fair]

Read full article @ Repeating Islands





Disturbing Collection of Poems

5 11 2011

New Book: “Cadáver de bailarina”

Described as “a disturbing collection of poems, ideal to read before going to the bed (or the grave),” Cadáver de bailarina y otros poemas [Body of a Dancer and other poems] (Lulu, 2011) is a new book by Rosalina Martínez González.

Description: A dancer who returns from death to complete the mise-en-scène. Centuries-old night owls meditate about their craft: blood; oriental spirits who tell of their adventures from the body of their victims, and conversations with more or less famous dead people. Cadáver de bailarina y otros poemas reflects on various phenomena surrounding the death, dark feelings and emotions contained from the perspective of the beings that take center stage. A collection of poems of improbable post-mortem experiences, ideal to read before going to bed (or the grave).

Read full article @ Repeating Islands





Tips on How to Write Fiction

5 11 2011

 

How to write fiction: Geoff Dyer on freedom

Writing is a natural process – we’re all geared up to do it, says Geoff Dyer
Open thread: how to write fiction

The great thing about this cat – the writing one – is that there are a thousand different ways to skin it. In fact, you don’t have to skin it at all – and it doesn’t even need to be a cat! What I mean, in the first instance, is feel free to dispute or ignore everything in this introduction or in the articles that follow. As Tobias Wolff puts it in his masterly novel Old School: “For a writer there is no such thing as an exemplary life … Certain writers do good work at the bottom of a bottle. The outlaws generally write as well as the bankers, though more briefly. Some writers flourish like opportunistic weeds by hiding among the citizens, others by toughing it out in one sort of desert or another.”

This freedom is the challenging perk of the non-job. If you are a tennis player any weakness – an inability, say, to deal with high-bouncing balls to your backhand – will be just that. And so you must devote long hours of practice to making the vulnerable parts of your game less vulnerable. If you are a writer the equivalent weakness can rarely be made good so you are probably better off letting it atrophy and enhancing some other aspect of your performance.

Writers are defined, in large measure, by what they can’t do. The mass of things that lie beyond their abilities force them to concentrate on the things they can. “I can’t do this,” exclaims the distraught Mother-Writer in People Like That Are the Only People Here, Lorrie Moore’s famous story about a young child dying of cancer. “I can do quasi-amusing phone dialogue. I do the careful ironies of daydreams. I do the marshy ideas upon which intimate life is built …” From the sum total of these apparent trivialities emerges a fiction which succeeds in doing precisely what it claims it can’t.

Read full article @ The Guardian